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1.  Surface plasmon enhanced light emission from AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si (111)
Chu-Young Cho, Yinjun Zhang, Erdem Cicek, Benjamin Rahnema, Yanbo Bai, Ryan McClintock, and Manijeh Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 211110 (2013)-- May 31, 2013
We report on the development of surface plasmon (SP) enhanced AlGaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on silicon (111) substrates. In order to generate SP-coupling with the radiating dipoles in MQWs, an aluminum layer is selectively deposited in holes etched in the top p-AlGaN to p-GaN layers. After flip-chip bonding and substrate removal, an optical output power of ∼1.2 mW is achieved at an emission wavelength of 346 nm; the output power of these UV LEDs with Al layer is increased by 45% compared to that of conventional UV LEDs without Al layer. This enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the spontaneous emission rate and improved internal quantum efficiency via resonance coupling between excitons in MQWs and SPs in the aluminum layer. reprint
 
2.  Engineering future light emitting diodes and photovoltaics with inexpensive materials: Integrating ZnO and Si into GaN-based devices
C. Bayram ; K. T. Shiu ; Y. Zhu ; C. W. Cheng ; D. K. Sadana ; F. H. Teherani ; D. J. Rogers ; V. E. Sandana ; P. Bove ; Y. Zhang ; S. Gautier ; C.-Y. Cho ; E. Cicek ; Z. Vashaei ; R. McClintock ; M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8626, Oxide-based Materials and Devices IV, 86260L (March 18, 2013)-- March 18, 2013
Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) based PV have the best fit to the solar spectrum of any alloy system and emerging LED lighting based on InGaN technology and has the potential to reduce energy consumption by nearly one half while enabling significant carbon emission reduction. However, getting the maximum benefit from GaN diode -based PV and LEDs will require wide-scale adoption. A key bottleneck for this is the device cost, which is currently dominated by the substrate (i.e. sapphire) and the epitaxy (i.e. GaN). This work investigates two schemes for reducing such costs. First, we investigated the integration of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) in InGaN-based diodes. (Successful growth of GaN on ZnO template layers (on sapphire) was illustrated. These templates can then be used as sacrificial release layers for chemical lift-off. Such an approach provides an alternative to laser lift-off for the transfer of GaN to substrates with a superior cost-performance profile, plus an added advantage of reclaiming the expensive single-crystal sapphire. It was also illustrated that substitution of low temperature n-type ZnO for n-GaN layers can combat indium leakage from InGaN quantum well active layers in inverted p-n junction structures. The ZnO overlayers can also double as transparent contacts with a nanostructured surface which enhances light in/out coupling. Thus ZnO was confirmed to be an effective GaN substitute which offers added flexibility in device design and can be used in order to simultaneously reduce the epitaxial cost and boost the device performance. Second, we investigated the use of GaN templates on patterned Silicon (100) substrates for reduced substrate cost LED applications. Controlled local metal organic chemical vapor deposition epitaxy of cubic phase GaN with on-axis Si(100) substrates was illustrated. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate uniformity and examine the defect structure in the GaN. Our results suggest that groove structures are very promising for controlled local epitaxy of cubic phase GaN. Overall, it is concluded that there are significant opportunities for cost reduction in novel hybrid diodes based on ZnO-InGaN-Si hybridization. reprint
 
3.  Crack-free AlGaN for solar-blind focal plane arrays through reduced area expitaxy
E. Cicek, R. McClintock, Z. Vashaei, Y. Zhang, S. Gautier, C.Y. Cho and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 102, No. 05, p. 051102-1-- February 4, 2013
We report on crack reduction for solar-blind ultraviolet detectors via the use of a reduced area epitaxy (RAE) method to regrow on patterned AlN templates. With the RAE method, a pre-deposited AlN template is patterned into isolated mesas in order to reduce the formation of cracks in the subsequently grown high Al-content AlxGa1−xN structure. By restricting the lateral dimensions of the epitaxial growth area, the biaxial strain is relaxed by the edges of the patterned squares, which resulted in ∼97% of the pixels being crack-free. After successful implementation of RAE method, we studied the optical characteristics, the external quantum efficiency, and responsivity of average pixel-sized detectors of the patterned sample increased from 38% and 86.2 mA/W to 57% and 129.4 mA/W, respectively, as the reverse bias is increased from 0 V to 5 V. Finally, we discussed the possibility of extending this approach for focal plane array, where crack-free large area material is necessary for high quality imaging. reprint
 
4.  Near milliwatt power AlGaN-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes based on lateral epitaxial overgrowth of AlN on Si(111)
Y. Zhang, S. Gautier, C. Cho, E. Cicek, Z, Vashaei, R. McClintock, C. Bayram, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 102, No. 1, p. 011106-1-- January 7, 2013
We report on the growth, fabrication, and device characterization of AlGaN-based thin-film ultraviolet (UV) (λ ∼ 359 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs). First, AlN/Si(111) template is patterned. Then, a fully coalesced 7-μm-thick lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of AlN layer is realized on patterned AlN/Si(111) template followed by UV LED epi-regrowth. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is employed to optimize LEO AlN and UV LED epitaxy. Back-emission UV LEDs are fabricated and flip-chip bonded to AlN heat sinks followed by Si(111) substrate removal. A peak pulsed power and slope efficiency of ∼0.6 mW and ∼1.3 μW/mA are demonstrated from these thin-film UV LEDs, respectively. For comparison, top-emission UV LEDs are fabricated and back-emission LEDs are shown to extract 50% more light than top-emission ones. reprint
 
5.  InP-based quantum-dot infrared photodetectors with high quantum efficiency and high temperature imaging
S. Tsao, H. Lim, H. Seo, W. Zhang and M. Razeghi
IEEE Sensors Journal, Vol. 8, No. 6, p. 936-941-- June 1, 2008
We report a room temperature operating InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector grown on InP substrate. The self-assembled InAs quantum dots and the device structure were grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor depositon. The detectivity was 6 x 1010cm·Hz1/2·W-1 at 150 K and a bias of 5 V with a peak detection wavelength around 4.0 micron and a quantum efficiency of 48%. Due to the low dark current and high responsivity, a clear photoresponse has been observed at room temperature. A 320 x 256 middle wavelength infrared focal plane array operating at temperatures up to 200 K was also demonstrated. The focal plane array had 34 mA/W responsivity, 1.1% conversion efficiency, and noise equivalent temperature difference of 344 mK at 120 K operating temperature. reprint
 
6.  Room temperature continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with watt-level optical power
Y. Bai, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, W. Zhang, A. Evans, J. Nguyen and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, No. 10, p. 101105-1-- March 10, 2008
We demonstrate quantum cascade lasers at an emitting wavelength of 4.6 µm, which are capable of room temperature, high power continuous wave (cw) operation. Buried ridge geometry with a width of 9.8 µm was utilized. A device with a 3 mm cavity length that was epilayer-down bonded on a diamond submount exhibited a maximum output power of 1.3 W at room temperature in cw operation. The maximum output power at 80 K was measured to be 4 W, with a wall plug efficiency of 27%. reprint
 
7.  Electrically pumped photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers
Y. Bai, P. Sung, S.R. Darvish, W. Zhang, A. Evans, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000A-1-8.-- February 1, 2008
We demonstrate electrically pumped, room temperature, single mode operation of photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) quantum cascade lasers emitting at ~ 4.75 µm. Ridge waveguides of 50 µm and 100 µm width were fabricated with both PCDFB and Fabry-Perot feedback mechanisms. The Fabry-Perot device has a broad emitting spectrum and a broad far-field character. The PCDFB devices have primarily a single spectral mode and a diffraction limited far field characteristic with a full angular width at half-maximum of 4.8 degrees and 2.4 degrees for the 50 µm and 100 µm ridge widths, respectively. reprint
 
8.  Overview of Quantum Cascade Laser Research at the Center for Quantum Devices
S. Slivken, A. Evans, J. Nguyen, Y. Bai, P. Sung, S.R. Darvish, W. Zhang and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000B-1-8.-- February 1, 2008
Over the past several years, our group has endeavored to develop high power quantum cascade lasers for a variety of remote and high sensitivity infrared applications. The systematic optimization of laser performance has allowed for demonstration of high power, continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating above room temperature. In the past year alone, the efficiency and power of our short wavelength lasers (~4.8 µm) has doubled. In continuous wave at room temperature, we have now separately demonstrated ~10% wallplug efficiency and ~700 mW of output power. Up to now, we have been able to show that room temperature continuous wave operation with > 100 mW output power in the 3.8 < λ < 11.5 µm wavelength range is possible. reprint
 
9.  Thermal imaging based on high-performance InAs/InP quantum-dot infrared photodetector operating at high temperature
M. Razeghi; H. Lim; S. Tsao; H. Seo; W. Zhang
Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS.15-16:[4382251] (2007).-- October 21, 2007
We report a room temperature operating and high-performance InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector on InP substrate and thermal imaging of 320times256 focal plane array based on this device up to 200 K. reprint
 
10.  Electrically pumped photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers
Y. Bai, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, P. Sung, J. Nguyen, A. Evans, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 14, p. 141123-1-- October 1, 2007
We demonstrate electrically pumped, room temperature, single mode operation of photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) quantum cascade lasers emitting at ~4.75 µm. Ridge waveguides of 100 µm width were fabricated with both PCDFB and Fabry-Pérot feedback mechanisms. The Fabry-Pérot device has a broad emitting spectrum and a double lobed far-field character. The PCDFB device, as expected, has primarily a single spectral mode and a diffraction limited far field characteristic with a full angular width at half maximum of 2.4°. This accomplishment represents the first step in power scaling of single mode, midinfrared laser diodes operating at room temperature. reprint
 
11.  High operating temperature 320 x 256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array imaging based on an InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum dot infrared photodetector
S. Tsao, H. Lim, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology-- May 28, 2007reprint
 
12.  High operating temperature 320 x 256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array imaging based on an InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum dot infrared photodetector
S. Tsao, H. Lim, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 20, p. 201109-- May 14, 2007
This letter reports a 320×256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array operating at temperatures up to 200 K based on an InAs quantum dot/InGaAs quantum well/InAlAs barrier detector grown on InP substrate by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The device's low dark current density and the persistence of the photocurrent up to room temperature enabled the high temperature imaging. The focal plane array had a peak detection wavelength of 4 µm, a responsivity of 34 mA/W, a conversion efficiency of 1.1%, and a noise equivalent temperature difference of 344 mK at an operating temperature of 120 K. reprint
 
13.  Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dot infrared photodetector operating at room temperature and focal plane array
Ho-Chul Lim; Stanley Tsao; Wei Zhang; Manijen Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 6542, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXIII, 65420R (May 14, 2007)-- May 14, 2007
Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots have attracted much attention because of their novel properties and thus possible practical applications including the lasers, detectors and modulators. Especially the photodetectors which have quantum dots in their active region have been developed and show promising performances such as high operation temperature due to three dimensional confinement of the carriers and normal incidence in contrast to the case of quantum well detectors which require special optical coupling schemes. Here we report our recent results for mid-wavelength infrared quantum dot infrared photodetector grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The material system we have investigated consists of 25 period self-assembled InAs quantum dot layers on InAlAs barriers, which are lattice-matched to InP substrates, covered with InGaAs quantum well layers and InAlAs barriers. This active region was sandwiched by highly doped InP contact layers. The device operates at 4.1 μm with a peak detectivity of 2.8×1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 120 K and a quantum efficiency of 35 %. The photoresponse can be observed even at room temperature resulting in a peak detectivity of 6×107 cm·Hz1/2/W. A 320×256 focal plane array has been fabricated in this kind of device. Its performance will also be discussed here. reprint
 
14.  High-power, continuous-operation intersubband laser for wavelengths greater than 10 micron
S. Slivken, A. Evans, W. Zhang and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 15, p. 151115-1-- April 9, 2007
In this letter, high-power continuous-wave emission (>100 mW) and high temperature operation (358 K) at a wavelength of 10.6 µm is demonstrated using an individual diode laser. This wavelength is advantageous for many medium-power applications previously reserved for the carbon dioxide laser. Improved performance was accomplished using industry-standard InP-based materials and by careful attention to design, growth, and fabrication limitations specific to long-wave infrared semiconductor lasers. The main problem areas are explored with regard to laser performance, and general steps are outlined to minimize their impact. reprint
 
15.  High-performance InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetectors grown on InP substrate operating at room temperature
H. Lim, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 13, p. 131112-1-- March 26, 2007
The authors report a room temperature operating InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector grown on InP substrate. The self-assembled InAs quantum dots and the device structure were grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The detectivity was 2.8×1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 120 K and a bias of −5 V with a peak detection wavelength around 4.1 μm and a quantum efficiency of 35%. Due to the low dark current and high responsivity, a clear photoresponse has been observed at room temperature, which gives a detectivity of 6.7×107 cm·Hz1/2/W. reprint
 
16.  High-power continuous-wave operation of distributed-feedback quantum-cascade lasers at λ ~ 7.8 µm
S.R. Darvish, W. Zhang, A. Evans, J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 89 (25)-- December 18, 2006
The authors present high-power continuous-wave (cw) operation of distributed-feedback quantum-cascade lasers. Continuous-wave output powers of 56 mW at 25 °C and 15 mW at 40 °C are obtained. Single-mode emission near 7.8 μm with a side-mode suppression ratio of >=30 dB and a tuning range of 2.83 cm−1 was obtained between 15 and 40 °C. The device exhibits no beam steering with a full width at half maximum of 27.4° at 25 °C in cw mode. reprint
 
17.  Gain and recombination dynamics of quantum-dot infrared photodetecto
H. Lim, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang, A.A. Quivy, and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology-- December 4, 2006reprint
 
18.  Gain and recombination dynamics of quantum-dot infrared photodetectors
H. Lim, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang, A.A. Quivy, and M. Razeghi
Physical Review B, 74 (20)-- November 15, 2006
In this paper we present a theory of diffusion and recombination in QDIPs which is an attempt to explain the recently reported values of gain in these devices. We allow the kinetics to encompass both the diffusion and capture rate limited regimes of carrier relaxation using rigorous random walk and diffusion methods. The photoconductive gains are calculated and compared with the experimental values obtained from InGaAs/InGaP/GaAs and InAs/InP QDIPs using the generation-recombination noise analysis. reprint
 
19.  High performance mid-wavelength quantum dot infrared photodetectors for focal plane arrays
M. Razeghi, H. Lim, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang and A.A. Quivy
SPIE Conference, San Diego, CA, Vol. 6297, pp. 62970C-- August 13, 2006
Quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for detection in the middle wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) ranges. Here, we report our recent results for mid-wavelength QDIPs grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Three monolayer of In0.68Ga0.32As self-assembled via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and formed lens-shaped InGaAs quantum dots with a density around 3×1010 cm-2. The peak responsivity at 77 K was measured to be 3.4 A/W at a bias of -1.9 V with 4.7 µm peak detection wavelength. Focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on these devices have been developed. The preliminary result of FPA imaging is presented. reprint
 
20.  Quantum Dots in GaInP/GaInAs/GaAs for Infrared Sensing
M. Razeghi, H. Lim, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang, and A.A. Quivy
Advances in Science and Technology 51-- June 4, 2006
Quantum dots grown by epitaxial self-assembly via Stranski- Krastanov growth mode have many favorable properties for infrared sensing. Because of their very small size and three-dimensional confinement, the electronic energy levels are quantized and discrete. These quantum effects lead to a unique property, “phonon bottleneck”, which might enable the high operating temperature of infrared sensing which usually requires cryogenic cooling. Here we report a focal plane array (FPA) based on an epitaxial self-assembled quantum dot infrared detector (QDIP). The device structure containing self-assembled In0.68Ga0.32As quantum dots with a density around 3×1010 cm-2 was grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD). Using different structures, we successfully developed QDIPs with a peak photoresponse around 5 μm and 9 μm. High peak detectivities were achieved at 77 K from both QDIPs. By stacking both device structures, we demonstrated a two-color QDIP whose peak detection wavelength could be tuned from 5 μm to 9 μm by changing the bias. 256×256 detector arrays based on 5 μm and 9 μm-QDIPs were fabricated with standard photolithography, dry etching and hybridization to a read-out integrated circuit (ROIC). We demonstrated thermal imaging from our FPAs based on QDIPs.
 
21.  Quantum-dot infrared photodetectors and focal plane arrays
M. Razeghi, H. Lim, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang, and A.A. Quivy
SPIE Infrared Technology and Applications Conference, April 17-21, 2006, Orlando, FL Proceedings – Infrared Technology and Applications XXXII, Vol. 6206, p. 62060I-1-- April 21, 2006
We report our recent results about mid-wavelength infrared quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A very high responsivity and a very low dark current were obtained. A high peak detectivity of the order of 3×1012 Jones was achieved at 77 K. The temperature dependent device performance was also investigated. The improved temperature insensitivity compared to QWIPs was attributed to the properties of quantum dots. The device showed a background limited performance temperature of 220 K with a 45° field of view and 300K background. reprint
 
22.  High-detectivity quantum-dot infrared photodetectors grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition
J. Szafraniec, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, H. Lim, M. Taguchi, A.A. Quivy, B. Movaghar and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 88 (121102)-- March 20, 2006
A mid-wavelength infrared photodetector based on InGaAs quantum dots buried in an InGaP matrix and deposited on a GaAs substrate was demonstrated. Its photoresponse at T=77 K was measured to be around 4.7 μm with a cutoff at 5.5 μm. Due to the high peak responsivity of 1.2 A/W and low dark-current noise of the device, a specific peak detectivity of 1.1 x 1012 cm·Hz½·W−1 was achieved at −0.9 V bias reprint
 
23.  InGaAs/InGaP Quantum-Dot Photodetector with a High Detectivity
H. Lim, S. Tsao, M. Taguchi, W. Zhang, A. Quivy and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 6127, pp. 61270N-- January 23, 2006
Quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have recently been considered as strong candidates for numerous applications such as night vision, space communication, gas analysis and medical diagnosis involving middle and long wavelength infrared (MWIR and LWIR respectively) operation. This is due to their unique properties arising from their 3-dimensional confinement potential that provides a discrete density of states. They are expected to outperform quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) as a consequence of their natural sensitivity to normal incident radiation, their higher responsivity and their higher-temperature operation. So far, most of the QDIPs reported in the literature were based on the InAs/GaAs system and were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Here, we report on the growth of a high detectivity InGaAs/InGaP QDIP grown on a GaAs substrate using low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). reprint
 
24.  InAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors on InP by MOCVD
W. Zhang, H. Lim, M. Taguchi, A. Quivy and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 6127, pp. 61270M -- January 23, 2006
We report our recent results of InAs quantum dots grown on InP substrate by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for the application of quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). We have previously demonstrated the first InP-based QDIP with a peak detection wavelength at 6.4 µm and a detectivity of 1010 cm·Hz½/W at 77K. Here we show our recent work toward shifting the detection wavelength to the 3-5 µm middlewavelength infrared (MWIR) range. The dependence of the quantum dot on the growth conditions is studied by atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Possible ways to increase the quantum efficiency of QDIPs are discussed. reprint
 
25.  Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors: Comparison Experiment and Theory
H. Lim, W. Zhang, S. Tsao, T. Sills, J. Szafraniec, K. Mi, B. Movaghar, and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology 12 (9)-- August 29, 2005reprint
 

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