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1.  High quantum efficiency two color type-II InAs/GaSb n-i-p-p-i-n photodiodes
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, A. Hood, E.K. Huang, M. Razeghi, and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, No. 11, p. 111112-1-- March 17, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
A n-i-p-p-i-n photodiode based on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice was grown on a GaSb substrate. The two channels, with respective 50% of responsivity cutoff wavelengths at 7.7 and 10 µm, presented quantum efficiencies (QEs) of 47% and 39% at 77 K. The devices can be operated as two diodes for simultaneous detection or as a single n-i-p-p-i-n detector for sequential detection. In the latter configuration, the QEs at 5.3 and 8.5 µm were measured as high as 40% and 39% at 77 K. The optical cross-talk between the two channels could be reduced from 0.36 to 0.08 by applying a 50 mV bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Recent advances of terahertz quantum cascade lasers
Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8119, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications II, 81190D (September 07, 2011)-- November 7, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
In the past decade, tremendous development has been made in GaAs/AlGaAs based THz quantum cascade laser (QCLs), however, the maximum operating temperature is still limited below 200 K (without magnetic field). THz QCL based on difference frequency generation (DFG) represents a viable technology for room temperature operation. Recently, we have demonstrated room temperature THz emission (∼ 4 THz) up to 8.5 μW with a power conversion efficiency of 10 μW/W². A dual-period distributed feedback grating is used to filter the mid-infrared spectra in favor of an extremely narrow THz linewidth of 6.6 GHz. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-power laser diodes based on InGaAsP alloys
M. Razeghi
Nature, Vol.369, p.631-633-- June 23, 1994 ...[Visit Journal]
HIGH-POWER, high-coherence solid-state lasers, based on dielectric materials such as ruby or Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminium garnet), have many civilian and military applications. The active media in these lasers are insulating, and must therefore be excited (or ‘pumped’) by optical, rather than electrical, means. Conventional gas-discharge lamps can be used as the pumping source, but semiconductor diode lasers are more efficient, as their wavelength can be tailored to match the absorption properties of the lasing material. Semiconducting AlGaAs alloys are widely used for this purpose, but oxidation of the aluminium and the spreading of defects during device operation limit the lifetime of the diodes3, and hence the reliability of the system as a whole. Aluminium-free InGaAsP compounds, on the other hand, do not have these lifetime-limiting properties. We report here the fabrication of high-power lasers based on InGaAsP (lattice-matched to GaAs substrates), which operate over the same wavelength range as conventional AlGaAs laser diodes and show significantly improved reliability. The other optical and electrical properties of these diodes are either comparable or superior to those of the AlGaAs system. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  New frontiers in InP based quantum devices
Manijeh Razeghi
Indium Phosphide and Related Materials, 2008. IPRM 2008. 20th International Conference on, pp.1,4, (2008)-- May 29, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent research activities taking place at center for quantum devices (CQD) based on InP material system, especially the exploration and demonstration of the state-of-art high performance quantum cascade lasers (QCL), greatly facilitate the understanding of the underlining physical principles governing the device operation. Thanks to the endless effort putting into the semiconductor epitaxy technologies, including the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD), the world has seen a close approaching to the ultimate band gap engineering. Highly sophisticated man-made heterostructure, which incorporates hundreds of alternating layers of GaInAs/AlInAs with each layer thickness and composition specifically designed, can be created within a single growth. The material quality is evidenced by the atomically abrupt interfaces. The versatility of the band gap engineering is greatly enhanced by the strain-balanced technique, which allows for growing structures with continuously tunable conduction band offset with little defects. As a result, the room temperature continuous wave (CW) wall plug efficiency (WPE) and the maximum achievable output optical power from a single device have been constantly improving. Novel waveguide incorporating the photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) mechanism is also investigated with satisfactory preliminary results. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High operability 1024 x 1024 long wavelength infrared focal plane array base on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice
A. Haddadi, S.R. Darvish, G. Chen, A.M. Hoang, B.M. Nguyen and M. Razeghi
AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 1416, p. 56-58_NGS15 Conf_Blacksburg, VA_Aug 1-5, 2011-- December 31, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Fabrication and characterization of a high performance 1024×1024 long wavelength infrared type‐II superlattice focal plane array are described. The FPA performs imaging at a continous rate of 15.00 frames/sec. Each pixel has pitch of 18μm with a fill factor of 71.31%. It demonstrates excellent operability of 95.8% and 97.4% at 81 and 68K operation temperature. The external quantum efficiency is ∼81% without any antireflective coating. Using F∕2 optics and an integration time of 0.13ms, the FPA exhibits an NEDT as low as 27 and 19mK at operating temperatures of 81 and 68K respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Fabrication of Indium Bumps for Hybrid Infrared Focal Plane Array Applications
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, T. O'Sullivan, M. Razeghi, and G.J. Brown
Infrared Physics and Technology, 45 (2)-- March 1, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
Hybrid infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) have found many applications. In hybrid IR FPAs, FPA and Si read out integrated circuits (ROICs) are bonded together with indium bumps by flip-chip bonding. Taller and higher uniformity indium bumps are always being pursued in FPA fabrication. In this paper, two indium bump fabrication processes based on evaporation and electroplating techniques are developed. Issues related to each fabrication technique are addressed in detail. The evaporation technique is based on a unique positive lithography process. The electroplating method achieves taller indium bumps with a high aspect ratio by a unique “multi-stack” technique. This technique could potentially benefit the fabrication of multi-color FPAs. Finally, a proposed low-cost indium bump fabrication technique, the “bump transfer”, is given as a future technology for hybrid IR FPA fabrication. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Performance Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes
H. Mohseni, Y. Wei, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the demonstration of high performance p-i-n photodiodes based on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices operating in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range at 80 K. Material is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates with excellent crystal quality as evidenced by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The processed devices with a 50% cutoff wavelength of λc equals 22 μm show a peak current responsivity about 5.5 A/W at 80 K. The use of binary layers in the superlattice has significantly enhanced the uniformity and reproducibility of the energy gap. The 90% to 10% cut-off energy width of these devices is on the order of 2 kT which is about four times smaller compared to the devices based on InAs/Ga1-xInxSb superlattices. Similar photovoltaic devices with cut-off wavelengths up to 25 μm have been measured at 80 K. Our experimental results shows excellent uniformity over a three inch wafer area, indicating the possibility of VLWIR focal plane arrays based on Type-II superlattices. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Detectivity InGaAs/InGaP Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors Grown by Low Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, T. O'Sullivan, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T. Sills, K. Mi, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology 9 (12)-- March 29, 2004 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Toward realizing high power semiconductor terahertz laser sources at room temperature
Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8023, Terahertz Physics, Devices, and Systems V: Advance Applications in Industry and Defense, 802302 (May 25, 2011)-- May 25, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
The terahertz (THz) spectral range offers promising applications in science, industry, and military. THz penetration through nonconductors (fabrics, wood, plastic) enables a more efficient way of performing security checks (for example at airports), as illegal drugs and explosives could be detected. Being a non-ionizing radiation, THz radiation is environment-friendly enabling a safer analysis environment than conventional X-ray based techniques. However, the lack of a compact room temperature THz laser source greatly hinders mass deployment of THz systems in security check points and medical centers. In the past decade, tremendous development has been made in GaAs/AlGaAs based THz Quantum Cascade Laser (QCLs), with maximum operating temperatures close to 200 K (without magnetic field). However, higher temperature operation is severely limited by a small LO-phonon energy (∼ 36 meV) in this material system. With a much larger LO-phonon energy of ∼ 90 meV, III-Nitrides are promising candidates for room temperature THz lasers. However, realizing high quality material for GaN-based intersubband devices presents a significant challenge. Advances with this approach will be presented. Alternatively, recent demonstration of InP based mid-infrared QCLs with extremely high peak power of 120 W at room temperature opens up the possibility of producing high power THz emission with difference frequency generation through two mid-infrared wavelengths. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  MOCVD Growth of ZnO Nanostructures Using Au Droplets as Catalysts
V.E. Sandana, D.J. Rogers, F.H. Teherani, R. McClintock, M. Razeghi, H.J. Drouhin, M.C. Clochard, V. Sallett, G. Garry and F. Fayoud
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Zinc Oxide Materials and Devices III, Vol. 6895, p. 68950Z-1-6.-- February 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
ZnO nanostructures were synthesised by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition growth on Si (100) and c-Al2O3 substrates coated with a 5nm thick layer of Au. The Au coated substrates were annealed in air prior to deposition of ZnO so as to promote formation of Au nanodroplets. The development of the nanodroplets was studied as a function of annealing duration and temperature. Under optimised conditions, a relatively homogeneous distribution of regular Au nanodroplets was obtained. Using the Au nanodroplets as a catalyst, MOCVD growth of ZnO nanostructures was studied. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nanostructures with various forms including commonly observed structures such as nanorods, nanoneedles and nanotubes. Some novel nanostructures were also observed, however, which resembled twist pastries and bevelled-multifaceted table legs. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array
E. Cicek, Z. Vashaei, R. McClintock, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Conference on Infrared Sensors, Devices and Applications; and Single Photon Imaging II, Vol. 8155, p. 81551O-1-- August 21, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A·cm-2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Miniaturization: enabling technology for the new millennium
M. Razeghi and H. Mohseni
SPIE International Conference on Solid State Crystals, Zakopane, Poland, -- April 1, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
The history of semiconductor devices has been characterized by a constant drive toward lower dimensions in order to increase integration density, system functionality and performance. However, this is still far from being comparable with the performance of natural systems such as human brain. The challenges facing semiconductor technologies in the millennium will be to move toward miniaturization. The influence of this trend on the quantum sensing of infrared radiation is one example that is elaborated here. A new generation of infrared detectors has been developed by growing layers of different semiconductors with nanometer thicknesses. The resulted badgap engineered semiconductor has superior performance compared to the bulk material. To enhance this technology further, we plan to move from quantum wells to quantum wire and quantum dots. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Watt level performance of quantum cascade lasers in room temperature continuous wave operation at λ ∼ 3.76 μm
N. Bandyopadhyay, Y. Bai, B. Gokden, A. Myzaferi, S. Tsao, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No. 13-- September 27, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP-based quantum cascade laser heterostructure emitting at 3.76 μm is grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The laser core is composed of strain balanced In0.76Ga0.24As/In0.26Al0.74As. Pulsed testing at room temperature exhibits a low threshold current density (1.5 kA/cm²) and high wall plug efficiency (10%). Room temperature continuous wave operation gives 6% wall plug efficiency with a maximum output power of 1.1 W. Continuous wave operation persists up to 95 °C. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Buried heterostructure quantum cascade lasers with high continuous-wave wall plug efficiency
A. Evans, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, J. Nguyen, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 7, p. 071101-1-- August 13, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
The authors report on the development of ~4.7 µm strain-balanced InP-based quantum cascade lasers with high wall plug efficiency and room temperature continuous-wave operation. The use of narrow-ridge buried heterostructure waveguides and thermally optimized packaging is presented. Over 9.3% wall plug efficiency is reported at room temperature from a single device producing over 0.675 W of continuous-wave output power. Wall plug efficiencies greater than 18% are also reported for devices at a temperature of 150 K, with continuous-wave output powers of more than 1 W. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High performance focal plane array based on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice heterostructures
P.Y. Delaunay and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000M-1-10.-- February 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent progress in growth techniques, structure design and processing has lifted the performances of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors. A double heterostructure design, based on a low band gap (11 µm) active region and high band gap (5 µm) superlattice contacts, reduced the sensitivity of the superlattice to surface effects. The heterodiodes with an 11 µm cutoff, passivated with SiO2, presented similar performances to unpassivated devices and a one order of magnitude increase of the resistivity of the sidewalls, even after flip-chip bonding and underfill. Thanks to this new design and to the inversion of the polarity of the devices, a high performance focal plane array with an 11 µm cutoff was demonstrated. The noise equivalent temperature difference was measured as 26 mK and 19 mK for operating temperatures of 81 K and 67 K. At an integration time of 0.08 ms, the FPA presented a quantum efficiency superior to 50%. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Thermal imaging based on high-performance InAs/InP quantum-dot infrared photodetector operating at high temperature
M. Razeghi; H. Lim; S. Tsao; H. Seo; W. Zhang
Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS.15-16:[4382251] (2007).-- October 21, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a room temperature operating and high-performance InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector on InP substrate and thermal imaging of 320times256 focal plane array based on this device up to 200 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Quantum Dot Intersubband Photodetectors
C. Jelen, M. Erdtmann, S. Kim, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum dots are recognized as very promising candidates for the fabrication of intersubband photodetectors in the infrared spectral range. At present, material quality is making rapid progress and some devices have been demonstrated. Examples of mid-infrared quantum dot intersubband photodetectors are presented along with device design and data analysis. Nonetheless, the performance of these devices remains less than comparable quantum well intersubband photodetectors due to difficulties in controlling the quantum dot size and distribution during epitaxy. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  A detailed analysis of carrier transport in InAs0.3Sb0.7 layers grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition
C. Besikci, Y.H. Choi, G. Labeyrie, E. Bigan and M. Razeghi with J.B. Cohen, J. Carsello, and V.P. Dravid
Journal of Applied Physics 76 (10)-- November 15, 1994 ...[Visit Journal]
InAs0.3Sb0.7 layers with mirrorlike morphology have been grown on GaAs substrates by low‐pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A room‐temperature electron Hall mobility of 2×104 cm²/V· s has been obtained for a 2 μm thick layer. Low‐temperature resistivity of the layers depended on TMIn flow rate and layer thickness. Hall mobility decreased monotonically with decreasing temperature below 300 K. A 77 K conductivity profile has shown an anomalous increase in the sample conductivity with decreasing thickness except in the near vicinity of the heterointerface. In order to interpret the experimental data, the effects of different scattering mechanisms on carrier mobility have been calculated, and the influences of the lattice mismatch and surface conduction on the Hall measurements have been investigated by applying a three‐layer Hall‐effect model. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that the combined effects of the dislocations generated by the large lattice mismatch and strong surface inversion may lead to deceptive Hall measurements by reflecting typical n‐type behavior for a p‐type sample, and the measured carrier concentration may considerably be affected by the surface conduction up to near room temperature. A quantitative analysis of dislocation scattering has shown significant degradation in electron mobility for dislocation densities above 107 cm−2. The effects of dislocation scattering on hole mobility have been found to be less severe. It has also been observed that there is a critical epilayer thickness (∼1 μm) below which the surface electron mobility is limited by dislocation scattering. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Solar-blind AlGaN photodiodes with very low cutoff wavelength
D. Walker, V. Kumar, K. Mi, P. Sandvik, P. Kung, X.H. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 76 (4)-- January 24, 2000 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the fabrication and characterization of AlxGa1–xN photodiodes (x~0.70) grown on sapphire by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The peak responsivity for –5 V bias is 0.11 A/W at 232 nm, corresponding to an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90%. The device response drops four orders of magnitude by 275 nm and remains at low response for the entire near-ultraviolet and visible spectrum. Improvements were made to the device design including a semitransparent Ni/Au contact layer and a GaN:Mg cap layer, which dramatically increased device response by enhancing the carrier collection efficiency. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High power photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers emitting at 4.5 micron
B. Gokden, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (January 22-28, 2010), Vol. 7608, p. 760806-1-- January 22, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum cascade lasers possess very small linewidth enhancement factor, which makes them very prominent candidates for realization of high power, nearly diffraction limited and single mode photonic crystal distributed feedback broad area lasers in the mid-infrared frequencies. In this paper, we present room temperature operation of a two dimensional photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.5 µm. peak power up to ~0.9 W per facet is obtained from a 2 mm long laser with 100 µm cavity width at room temperature. The observed spectrum is single mode with a very narrow linewidth. Far-field profile has nearly diffraction limited single lobe with full width at half maximum of 3.5 degree normal to the facet. The mode selection and power output relationships are experimentally established with respect to different cavity lengths for photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-Power CW Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
J.R. Meyer, W.W. Bewley, J.R. Lindle, I. Vurgaftman, A.J. Evans, J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the cw operation of quantum cascade lasers that do not require cryogenic cooling and emit at λ = 4.7-6.2 µm. At 200 K, more than 1 W of output power is obtained from 12-µm-wide stripes, with a wall-plug efficiency (ηwall) near 10%. Room-temperature cw operation has also been demonstrated, with a maximum output power of 640 mW (ηwall = 4.5%) at 6 µm and 260 mW (ηwall = 2.3%) at 4.8 µm. Far-field characterization indicates that whereas the beam quality remains close to the diffraction limit in all of the tested lasers, in the devices emitting at 6.2 µm the beam tends to steer by as much as 5-10° degrees in either direction with varying temperature and pump current. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Current status of high performance quantum cascade lasers at the center for quantum devices
M. Razeghi; A. Evans; Y. Bai; J. Nguyen; S. Slivken; S.R. Darvish; K. Mi
Conference Proceedings - International Conference on Indium Phosphide and Related Materials. 588-593:[4266015] (2007)-- May 14, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Mid-infrared laser sources are highly desired for laser-based trace chemical sensors, military countermeasures, free-space communications, as well as developing medical applications. While application development has been limited by the availability of adequate mid-infrared sources, InP-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) hold promise as inexpensive, miniature, portable solutions capable of producing high powers and operating at high temperatures with excellent beam quality and superior reliability. This paper discusses the most recent developments of application-ready high power (> 100 mW), continuous-wave (CW), mid-infrared QCLs operating above room temperature with lifetimes exceeding 13,000 hours. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High power, electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers
Steven Slivken; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9755, Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics-- February 13, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
Mid-infrared laser sources (3-14 μm wavelengths) which have wide spectral coverage and high output power are attractive for many applications. This spectral range contains unique absorption fingerprints of most molecules, including toxins, explosives, and nerve agents. Infrared spectroscopy can also be used to detect important biomarkers, which can be used for medical diagnostics by means of breath analysis. The challenge is to produce a broadband midinfrared source which is small, lightweight, robust, and inexpensive. We are currently investigating monolithic solutions using quantum cascade lasers. A wide gain bandwidth is not sufficient to make an ideal spectroscopy source. Single mode output with rapid tuning is desirable. For dynamic wavelength selection, our group is developing multi-section laser geometries with wide electrical tuning (hundreds of cm-1). These devices are roughly the same size as a traditional quantum cascade lasers, but tuning is accomplished without any external optical components. When combined with suitable amplifiers, these lasers are capable of multi-Watt single mode output powers. This manuscript will describe our current research efforts and the potential for high performance, broadband electrical tuning with the quantum cascade laser. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Polarity inversion of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi and V. Nathan
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 10, p. 103503-1-- September 3, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
The authors demonstrated the realization of p-on-n Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes. Growth condition for high quality InAsSb layer lattice matched to GaSb was established for the use of an effective n-contact layer. By studying the effect of various GaSb capping layer thicknesses on the optical and electrical performances, an optimized thickness of 160 nm was determined. In comparison to as grown n-on-p superlattice photodiodes, this inverted design of p on n has shown similar quality. Finally, by analyzing Fabry-Perot interference fringes in the front side illuminated spectral measurement, the refractive index of the superlattice was determined to be approximately 3.8. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Demonstration of mid-infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes grown on GaAs substrate
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, E.K. Huang, S. Bogdanov, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 94, No. 22-- June 8, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the growth and characterization of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes grown on a GaAs substrate. Through a low nucleation temperature and a reduced growth rate, a smooth GaSb surface was obtained on the GaAs substrate with clear atomic steps and low roughness morphology. On the top of the GaSb buffer, a p+-i-n+ type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiode was grown with a designed cutoff wavelength of 4 μm. The detector exhibited a differential resistance at zero bias (R0A)in excess of 1600 Ω·cm2 and a quantum efficiency of 36.4% at 77 K, providing a specific detectivity of 6 X 1011 cm·Hz½/W and a background limited operating temperature of 100 K with a 300 K background. Uncooled detectors showed similar performance to those grown on GaSb substrates with a carrier lifetime of 110 ns and a detectivity of 6 X 108 cm·Hz½/W. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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