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5.  Room temperature continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with 12.5% wall plug efficiency
Y. Bai, S. Slivken, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 2, p. 021103-1-- July 14, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP based quantum cascade laser heterostructure emitting at 4.6 µm was grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The wafer was processed into a conventional double-channel ridge waveguide geometry with ridge widths of 19.7 and 10.6 µm without semi-insulating InP regrowth. An uncoated, narrow ridge device with a 4.8 mm cavity length was epilayer down bonded to a diamond submount and exhibits 2.5 W maximum output power with a wall plug efficiency of 12.5% at room temperature in continuous wave operation. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Active and passive infrared imager based on short-wave and mid-wave type-II superlattice dual-band detectors
E.K. Huang, A. Haddadi, G. Chen, A.M. Hoang, and M. Razeghi
Optics Letters, Vol. 38, no. 1, p. 22-24-- January 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
A versatile dual-band detector capable of active and passive use is demonstrated using short-wave (SW) and midwave(MW) IR type-II superlattice photodiodes. A bilayer etch-stop scheme is introduced for back-side-illuminated detectors, which enhanced the external quantum efficiency both in the SWIR and MWIR spectral regions. Temperature-dependent dark current measurements of pixel-sized 27 μm detectors found the dark current density to be ~1 × 10-5 A/cm² for the ∼4.2 μm cutoff MWIR channel at 140 K. This corresponded to a reasonable imager noise equivalent difference in temperature of ∼49 mK using F∕2.3 optics and a 10 ms integration time (tint), which lowered to ∼13 mK at 110 K using tint  30 ms, illustrating the potential for high-temperature operation. The SWIR channel was found to be limited by readout noise below 150 K. Excellent imagery from the dual-band imager exemplifying pixel coincidence is shown. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  RT-CW: widely tunable semiconductor THz QCL sources
M. Razeghi; Q. Y. Lu
Proceedings Volume 9934, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications -- September 26, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
Distinctive position of Terahertz (THz) frequencies (ν~0.3 -10 THz) in the electromagnetic spectrum with their lower quantum energy compared to IR and higher frequency compared to microwave range allows for many potential applications unique to them. Especially in the security side of the THz sensing applications, the distinct absorption spectra of explosives and related compounds in the range of 0.1–5 THz makes THz technology a competitive technique for detecting hidden explosives. A compact, high power, room temperature continuous wave terahertz source emitting in a wide frequency range will greatly boost the THz applications for the diagnosis and detection of explosives. Here we present a new strong-coupled strain-balanced quantum cascade laser design for efficient THz generation based intracavity DFG. Room temperature continuous wave operation with electrical frequency tuning range of 2.06-4.35 THz is demonstrated [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High performance antimony based type-II superlattice photodiodes on GaAs substrates
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 7298, Orlando, FL 2009, p. 72981T-- April 13, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices grown on GaSb substrate have achieved significant advances in both structural design and material growth, making Type-II superlattice infrared detector a rival competitor to the state-of-the-art MCT technology. However, the limited size and strong infrared absorption of GaSb substrates prevent large format type-II superlattice infrared imagers from being realized. In this work, we demonstrate type-II superlattices grown on GaAs substrates, which is a significant step toward third generation infrared imaging at low cost. The device performances of Type-II superalttice photodetectors grown on these two substrates are compared. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High-Power CW Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
J.R. Meyer, W.W. Bewley, J.R. Lindle, I. Vurgaftman, A.J. Evans, J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the cw operation of quantum cascade lasers that do not require cryogenic cooling and emit at λ = 4.7-6.2 µm. At 200 K, more than 1 W of output power is obtained from 12-µm-wide stripes, with a wall-plug efficiency (ηwall) near 10%. Room-temperature cw operation has also been demonstrated, with a maximum output power of 640 mW (ηwall = 4.5%) at 6 µm and 260 mW (ηwall = 2.3%) at 4.8 µm. Far-field characterization indicates that whereas the beam quality remains close to the diffraction limit in all of the tested lasers, in the devices emitting at 6.2 µm the beam tends to steer by as much as 5-10° degrees in either direction with varying temperature and pump current. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Type-II superlattice dual-band LWIR imager with M-barrier and Fabry-Perot resonance
E.K. Huang, A. Haddadi, G. Chen, B.M. Nguyen, M.A. Hoang, R. McClintock, M. Stegall, and M. Razeghi
OSA Optics Letters, Vol. 36, No. 13, p. 2560-2562-- July 1, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a high performance long-wavelength IR dual-band imager based on type-II superlattices with 100% cutoff wavelengths at 9.5 μm (blue channel) and 13 μm (red channel). Test pixels reveal background-limited behavior with specific detectivities as high as ∼5×1011 Jones at 7.9 μm in the blue channel and ∼1×1011 Jones at 10.2 μm in the red channel at 77 K. These performances were attributed to low dark currents thanks to the M-barrier and Fabry–Perot enhanced quantum efficiencies despite using thin 2 μm absorbing regions. In the imager, the high signal-to-noise ratio contributed to median noise equivalent temperature differences of ∼20 mK for both channels with integration times on the order of 0.5 ms, making it suitable for high speed applications. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Imprinting of Nanoporosity in Lithium-Doped Nickel Oxide through the use of Sacrificial Zinc Oxide Nanotemplates
Vinod E. Sandana, David J. Rogers, Ferechteh H. Teheran1, Philippe Bove, Ryan McClintock and Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 10105, Oxide-based Materials and Devices VIII, 101052C-- April 3, 2017 ...[Visit Journal]
Methods for simultaneously increasing the conductivity and the porosity of NiO layers grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were investigated in order to develop improved photocathodes for p-DSSC applications. NiO:Li (20at%) layers grown on c-Al2O3 by PLD showed a sharp drop in conductivity with increasing substrate temperature. Layers grown at room temperature were more than two orders of magnitude more conductive than undoped NiO layers but did not show evidence of any porosity in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images. A new method for imposing a nanoporosity in NiO was developed based on a sacrificial template of nanostructured ZnO. SEM images and EDX spectroscopy showed that a nanoporous morphology had been imprinted in the NiO overlayer after preferential chemical etching away of the nanostructured ZnO underlayer. Beyond p-DSSC applications, this new process could represent a new paradigm for imprinting porosity in a whole range of materials. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High Detectivity InGaAs/InGaP Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors Grown by Low Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, T. O'Sullivan, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T. Sills, K. Mi, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology 9 (12)-- March 29, 2004 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High power, electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers
Steven Slivken; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9755, Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics-- February 13, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
Mid-infrared laser sources (3-14 μm wavelengths) which have wide spectral coverage and high output power are attractive for many applications. This spectral range contains unique absorption fingerprints of most molecules, including toxins, explosives, and nerve agents. Infrared spectroscopy can also be used to detect important biomarkers, which can be used for medical diagnostics by means of breath analysis. The challenge is to produce a broadband midinfrared source which is small, lightweight, robust, and inexpensive. We are currently investigating monolithic solutions using quantum cascade lasers. A wide gain bandwidth is not sufficient to make an ideal spectroscopy source. Single mode output with rapid tuning is desirable. For dynamic wavelength selection, our group is developing multi-section laser geometries with wide electrical tuning (hundreds of cm-1). These devices are roughly the same size as a traditional quantum cascade lasers, but tuning is accomplished without any external optical components. When combined with suitable amplifiers, these lasers are capable of multi-Watt single mode output powers. This manuscript will describe our current research efforts and the potential for high performance, broadband electrical tuning with the quantum cascade laser. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High-Performance Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes with Cutoff Wavelength Around 7 µm
Y. Wei, A. Hood, H. Yau, V. Yazdanpanah, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and V. Nathan
Applied Physics Letters, 86 (9)-- February 28, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the most recent result in the area of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes that have a cutoff wavelength around 7 µm at 77 K. Superlattice with a period of 40 Å lattice matched to GaSb was realized using GaxIn1–x type interface engineering technique. Compared with significantly longer period superlattices, we have reduced the dark current density under reverse bias dramatically. For a 3 µm thick structure, using sulfide-based passivation, the dark current density reached 2.6×10–5 A/cm2 at –3 V reverse bias at 77 K. At this temperature the photodiodes have R0A of 9300 Ω·cm2 and a thermally limited zero bias detectivity of 1×1012 cm·Hz½/W. The 90%–10% cutoff energy width was only 16.5 meV. The devices did not show significant dark current change at 77 K after three months storage in the atmosphere. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Theoretical investigation of minority carrier leakage of high-power 0.8 μm InGaAsP/InGaP/GaAs laser diodes
J. Diaz, I. Eliashevich, H.J. Yi, M. Stanton, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 65 (18)-- October 31, 1994 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a theoretical model that accurately describes the effects of minority carrier leakage from the InGaAsP waveguide into InGaP cladding layers in high‐power aluminum-free 0.8 μm InGaAsP/InGaP/GaAs separate confinement heterostructure lasers. Current leakage due to the relatively low band‐gap discontinuity between the active region and the InGaP barrier can be eliminated by employing laser diodes with cavity length longer than 500 μm. Experimental results for lasers grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High Power, Continuous-Wave, Quantum Cascade Lasers for MWIR and LWIR Applications
S. Slivken, A. Evans, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 6127, pp. 612703-- January 23, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
Over the past several years, our group has endeavored to develop high power quantum cascade lasers for a variety of remote and high sensitivity infrared applications. The systematic optimization of laser performance has allowed for demonstration of high power, continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating above room temperature. Since 2002, the power levels for individual devices have jumped from 20 mW to 600 mW. Expanding on this development, we have able to demonstrate continuous wave operation at many wavelengths throughout the mid- and far-infrared spectral range, and have now achieved >100 mW output in the 4.0 to 9.5 µm range. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Minority electron unipolar photodetectors based on Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices for very long wavelength infrared detection
B.M. Nguyen, S. Bogdanov, S. Abdollahi Pour, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 18, p. 183502-- November 2, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
We present a hybrid photodetector design that inherits the advantages of traditional photoconductive and photovoltaic devices. The structure consists of a barrier layer blocking the transport of majority holes in a p-type semiconductor, resulting in an electrical transport due to minority carriers with low current density. By using the M-structure superlattice as a barrier region, the band alignments can be experimentally controlled, allowing for the efficient extraction of the photosignal with less than 50 mV bias. At 77 K, a 14 µm cutoff detector exhibits a dark current 3.3 mA·cm−2, a photoresponsivity of 1.4 A/W, and the associated shot noise detectivity of 4×1010 Jones. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Quantum cascade lasers that emit more light than heat
Y. Bai, S. Slivken, S. Kuboya, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
Nature Photonics, February 2010, Vol. 4, p. 99-102-- February 1, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
For any semiconductor lasers, the wall plug efficiency, that is, the portion of the injected electrical energy that can be converted into output optical energy, is one of the most important figures of merit. A device with a higher wall plug efficiency has a lower power demand and prolonged device lifetime due to its reduced self-heating. Since its invention, the power performance of the quantum cascade laser has improved tremendously. However, although the internal quantum efficiency can be engineered to be greater than 80% at low temperatures, the wall plug efficiency of a quantum cascade laser has never been demonstrated above 50% at any temperature. The best wall plug efficiency reported to date is 36% at 120 K. Here, we overcome the limiting factors using a single-well injector design and demonstrate 53% wall plug efficiency at 40 K with an emitting wavelength of 5 µm. In other words, we demonstrate a quantum cascade laser that produces more light than heat. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Room temperature operation of 8-12 μm InSbBi infrared photodetectors on GaAs substrates
J.J. Lee, J.D. Kim, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 73 (5)-- August 3, 1998 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the room temperature operation of 8–12 μm InSbBi long-wavelength infrared photodetectors. The InSbBi/InSb heterostructures were grown on semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrates by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The voltage responsivity at 10.6 μm was about 1.9 mV/W at room temperature and the corresponding Johnson noise limited detectivity was estimated to be about 1.2×106 cm·Hz½/W. The carrier lifetime derived from the voltage dependent responsivity measurements was about 0.7 ns. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High-power laser diodes based on InGaAsP alloys
M. Razeghi
Nature, Vol.369, p.631-633-- June 23, 1994 ...[Visit Journal]
HIGH-POWER, high-coherence solid-state lasers, based on dielectric materials such as ruby or Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminium garnet), have many civilian and military applications. The active media in these lasers are insulating, and must therefore be excited (or ‘pumped’) by optical, rather than electrical, means. Conventional gas-discharge lamps can be used as the pumping source, but semiconductor diode lasers are more efficient, as their wavelength can be tailored to match the absorption properties of the lasing material. Semiconducting AlGaAs alloys are widely used for this purpose, but oxidation of the aluminium and the spreading of defects during device operation limit the lifetime of the diodes3, and hence the reliability of the system as a whole. Aluminium-free InGaAsP compounds, on the other hand, do not have these lifetime-limiting properties. We report here the fabrication of high-power lasers based on InGaAsP (lattice-matched to GaAs substrates), which operate over the same wavelength range as conventional AlGaAs laser diodes and show significantly improved reliability. The other optical and electrical properties of these diodes are either comparable or superior to those of the AlGaAs system. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Quantum-Cascade Lasers Operating in Continuous-Wave Mode Above 90°C at λ ~5.25 µm
A. Evans, J. Nguyen, S. Slivken, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 88 (5)-- January 30, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the design and fabrication of λ~5.25 μm quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) for very high temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation. CW operation is reported up to a maximum temperature of 90 °C (363 K). CW output power is reported in excess of 500 mW near room temperature with a low threshold current density. A finite element thermal model is used to investigate the Gth and maximum CW operating temperature of the QCLs. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  The effect of doping the M-barrier in very long-wave type-II InAs/GaSb heterodiodes
D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and J. Pellegrino
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 3, p. 031107-1-- July 21, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
A variation on the standard homo-diode Type-II superlattice with an M-barrier between the pi-region and the n-region is shown to suppress the dark currents. By determining the optimal doping level of the M-superlattice, dark current densities of 4.95 mA·cm-2 and quantum efficiencies in excess of 20% have been demonstrated at the moderate reverse bias of 50 mV; allowing for near background-limited performance with a Johnson-noise detectivity of 3.11×1010 Jones at 77 K for a 14.58 µm cutoff wavelength for large area diodes without passivation. This is comparable to values for the state-of-the-art HgCdTe photodiodes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High operating temperature 320 x 256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array imaging based on an InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum dot infrared photodetector
S. Tsao, H. Lim, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology-- May 28, 2007 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High operating temperature MWIR photon detectors based on Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice
M. Razeghi, S. Abdollahi Pour, E.K. Huang, G. Chen, A. Haddadi and B.M. Nguyen
SPIE Proceedings, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXVII, Orlando, FL, Vol. 8012, p. 80122Q-1-- April 26, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent efforts have been paid to elevate the operating temperature of Type II superlattice Mid Infrared photon detectors. Using M-structure superlattice, novel device architectures have been developed, resulting in significant improvement of the device performances. In this paper, we will compare different photodetector architectures and discuss the optimization scheme which leads to almost one order of magnitude of improvement to the electrical performance. At 150K, single element detectors exhibit a quantum efficiency above 50%, and a specific detectivity of 1.05x10(12) cm.Hz(1/2)/W. BLIP operation with a 300K background and 2π FOV can be reached with an operating temperature up to 180K. High quality focal plane arrays were demonstrated with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) of 11mK up to 120K. Human body imaging is achieved at 150K with NEDT of 150mK. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Gain-length scaling in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors
T. Yamanaka, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Kuboya, A. Myzaferi and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 9-- August 31, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The gain in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors is investigated. The scaling of the gain with device length has been analyzed, and the behavior agrees with the previously proposed model. We conclude that we understand the gain in the low bias region, but in the high field region, discrepancies remain. An extension of the gain model is presented to cover the very high electric field region. The high field data are compared to the extended model and discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Near bulk-limited R0A of long-wavelength infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with polyimide surface passivation
Andrew Hood, Pierre-Yves Delaunay, Darin Hoffman, Binh-Minh Nguyen, Yajun Wei, Manijeh Razeghi, and Vaidya Nathan
Applied Physics Letters 90, 233513-- June 4, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Effective surface passivation of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with cutoff wavelengths in the long-wavelength infrared is presented. A stable passivation layer, the electrical properties of which do not change as a function of the ambient environment nor time, has been prepared by a solvent-based surface preparation, vacuum desorption, and the application of an insulating polyimide layer. Passivated photodiodes, with dimensions ranging from 400×400 to 25×25 µm2, with a cutoff wavelength of ~11 µm, exhibited near bulk-limited R0A values of ~12 Ω·cm2, surface resistivities in excess of 104 Ω·cm, and very uniform current-voltage behavior at 77 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Very Long Wavelength Infrared Type-II Detectors Operating at 80K
H. Mohseni, A. Tahraoui, J. Wojkowski, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, W.C. Mitchel, and Y.S. Park
Applied Physics Letters 77 (11)-- September 11, 2000 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a demonstration of very long wavelength infrared detectors based on InAs/GaSb superlattices operating at T = 80 K. Detector structures with excellent material quality were grown on an optimized GaSb buffer layer on GaAs semi-insulating substrates. Photoconductive devices with 50% cutoff wavelength of λc = 17  μm showed a peak responsivity of about 100 mA/W at T = 80  K. Devices with 50% cutoff wavelengths up to λc = 22  μm were demonstrated at this temperature. Good uniformity was obtained over large areas even for the devices with very long cutoff wavelengths. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  Suppresion of surface leakage in gate controlled Type-II InAs/GaSb mid-Infrared photodetectors
G. Chen, B.M. Nguyen, A.M. Hoang, E.K. Huang, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8268, p. 826811-- January 22, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
One of the biggest challenges of improving the electrical performance in Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetector is suppressing the surface leakage. Surface leakage screens important bulk dark current mechanisms, and brings difficulty and uncertainty to the material optimization and bulk intrinsic parameters extraction such as carrier lifetime and mobility. Most of surface treatments were attempted beyond the mid-infrared (MWIR) regime because compared to the bulk performance, surface leakage in MWIR was generally considered to be a minor factor. In this work, we show that below 150 K, surface leakage still strongly affects the electrical performance of the very high bulk performance p-π-M-n MWIR photon detectors. With gating technique, we can effectively eliminate the surface leakage in a controllable manner. At 110K, the dark current density of a 4.7 μm cut-off gated photon diode is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than the current density in SiO2 passivated ungated diode. With a quantum efficiency of 48%, the specific detecivity of gated diodes attains 2.5 x 1014 cm·Hz1/2/W, which is 3.6 times higher than that of ungated diodes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
5.  High-performance InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetectors grown on InP substrate operating at room temperature
H. Lim, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 13, p. 131112-1-- March 26, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
The authors report a room temperature operating InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector grown on InP substrate. The self-assembled InAs quantum dots and the device structure were grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The detectivity was 2.8×1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 120 K and a bias of −5 V with a peak detection wavelength around 4.1 μm and a quantum efficiency of 35%. Due to the low dark current and high responsivity, a clear photoresponse has been observed at room temperature, which gives a detectivity of 6.7×107 cm·Hz1/2/W. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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