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2.  High Power Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) Grown by GasMBE
M. Razeghi and S. Slivken
SPIE Proceedings, International Conference on Solid State Crystals (ICSSC), Zakopane, Poland, -- October 14, 2002 ...[Visit Journal]
This paper is a brief summary of the technological development and state-of-the-art performance of quantum cascade lasers produced at the Centre for Quantum Devices. Laser design will be discussed, as well as experimental details of device fabrication. Recent work has focused on the development of high peak and average power QCLs emitting at room temperature and above. Scaling of the output is demonstrated by increasing the number of emitting regions in the waveguide core. At λ = 9 µm, over 7 W of peak power has been demonstrated at room temperature for a single diode, with an average power of 300 mW at 6% duty cycle. At shorter wavelengths, laser development includes the use of highly strain-balanced heterostructures in order to maintain a high conduction band offset and minimize leakage current. At λ = 6 µm, utilizing a high reflective coating and epilayer-down mounting of the laser, we have demonstrated 225 mW of average power from a single facet at room temperature. Lastly, these results are put in perspective of other reported results and possible future directions are discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Thermal Conductivity of InAs/GaSb Type II Superlattice
C. Zhou, B.M. Nguyen, M. Razeghi and M. Grayson
Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 41, No. 9, p. 2322-2325-- August 1, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
The cross-plane thermal conductivity of a type II InAs/GaSb superlattice(T2SL) is measured from 13 K to 300 K using the 3x method. Thermal conductivity is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude relative to the GaSb bulk substrate. The low thermal conductivity of around 1 W/m K to 8 W/m K may serve as an advantage for thermoelectric applications at low temperatures, while presenting a challenge for T2SL interband cascade lasers and highpower photodiodes. We describe a power-law approximation to model nonlinearities in the thermal conductivity, resulting in increased or decreased peak temperature for negative or positive exponents, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-Power Distributed-Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers
W.W. Bewley, I. Vurgaftman, C.S. Kim, J.R. Meyer, J. Nguyen, A.J. Evans, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 6127, pp. 612704-- January 23, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
Recently, a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in a single spectral mode at 4.8 µm and at temperatures up to 333 K has been reported. In the present work, we provide detailed measurements and modeling of its performance characteristics. The sidemode suppression ratio exceeds 25 dB, and the emission remains robustly single-mode at all currents and temperatures tested. Cw output powers of 99 mW at 298 K and 357 mW at 200 K are obtained at currents well below the thermal rollover point. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Gain-length scaling in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors
T. Yamanaka, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Kuboya, A. Myzaferi and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology-- September 14, 2009 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dot infrared photodetector operating at room temperature and focal plane array
Ho-Chul Lim; Stanley Tsao; Wei Zhang; Manijen Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 6542, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXIII, 65420R (May 14, 2007)-- May 14, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots have attracted much attention because of their novel properties and thus possible practical applications including the lasers, detectors and modulators. Especially the photodetectors which have quantum dots in their active region have been developed and show promising performances such as high operation temperature due to three dimensional confinement of the carriers and normal incidence in contrast to the case of quantum well detectors which require special optical coupling schemes. Here we report our recent results for mid-wavelength infrared quantum dot infrared photodetector grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The material system we have investigated consists of 25 period self-assembled InAs quantum dot layers on InAlAs barriers, which are lattice-matched to InP substrates, covered with InGaAs quantum well layers and InAlAs barriers. This active region was sandwiched by highly doped InP contact layers. The device operates at 4.1 μm with a peak detectivity of 2.8×1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 120 K and a quantum efficiency of 35 %. The photoresponse can be observed even at room temperature resulting in a peak detectivity of 6×107 cm·Hz1/2/W. A 320×256 focal plane array has been fabricated in this kind of device. Its performance will also be discussed here. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High performance Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices for mid, long, and very long wavelength infrared focal plane arrays
M. Razeghi, Y. Wei, A. Gin, A. Hood, V. Yazdanpanah, M.Z. Tidrow, and V. Nathan
SPIE Conference, Orlando, FL, Vol. 5783, pp. 86-- March 28, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We present our most recent results and review our progress over the past few years regarding InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattices for photovoltaic detectors and focal plane arrays. Empirical tight binding methods have been proven to be very effective and accurate in designing superlattices for various cutoff wavelengths from 3.7 µm up to 32 µm. Excellent agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results has been obtained. High quality material growths were performed using an Intevac modular Gen II molecular beam epitaxy system. The material quality was characterized using x-ray, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscope and photoluminescence, etc. Detector performance confirmed high material electrical quality. Details of the demonstration of 256×256 long wavelength infrared focal plane arrays are presented. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High Performance Quantum Cascade Laser Results at the Centre for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi and S. Slivken
Physica Status Solidi, 195 (1)-- January 1, 2003 ...[Visit Journal]
In this paper, we review some of the history and recent results related to the development of the quantum cascade laser at the Center for Quantum Devices. The fabrication of the quantum cascade laser is described relative to growth, characterization, and processing. State-of-the-art testing results for 5-11 μm lasers will be then be explored, followed by a future outlook for the technology. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Characterization and Analysis of Single-Mode High-Power CW Quantum-Cascade Laser
W.W. Bewley, I. Vurgaftman, C.S. Kim, J.R. Meyer, J. Nguyen, A. Evans, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
Journal of Applied Physics 98-- October 15, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We measured and modeled the performance characteristics of a distributed-feedback quantum-cascade laser exhibiting high-power continuous-wave (CW) operation in a single spectral mode at λ~4.8 µm and temperatures up to 333 K. The sidemode suppression ratio exceeds 25 dB, and the emission remains robustly single mode at all currents and temperatures tested. CW output powers of 99 mW at 298 K and 357 mW at 200 K are obtained at currents well below the thermal rollover point. The slope efficiency and subthreshold amplified spontaneous emission spectra are shown to be consistent with a coupling coefficient of no more than κL ~ 4–5, which is substantially lower than the estimate of 9 based on the nominal grating fabrication parameters. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Buried heterostructure quantum cascade lasers with high continuous-wave wall plug efficiency
A. Evans, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, J. Nguyen, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 7, p. 071101-1-- August 13, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
The authors report on the development of ~4.7 µm strain-balanced InP-based quantum cascade lasers with high wall plug efficiency and room temperature continuous-wave operation. The use of narrow-ridge buried heterostructure waveguides and thermally optimized packaging is presented. Over 9.3% wall plug efficiency is reported at room temperature from a single device producing over 0.675 W of continuous-wave output power. Wall plug efficiencies greater than 18% are also reported for devices at a temperature of 150 K, with continuous-wave output powers of more than 1 W. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Growth and characterization of InSbBi for long wavelength infrared photodetectors
J.J. Lee, J.D. Kim, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 70 (24)-- June 16, 1997 ...[Visit Journal]
The epitaxial growth of InSbBi ternary alloys by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is reported on. X-ray diffraction spectra showed well resolved peaks of InSbBi and InSb films. Bi incorporation was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Photoresponse spectrum up to 9.3 μm which corresponds to 0.13 eV energy band gap has been measured in a sample with Bi composition of 5.8 at.% at 77 K. Electron mobility at room temperature ranges from 44 100 to 4910 cm²/V·s as Bi composition increases. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Type II superlattice infrared detectors and focal plane arrays
Vaidya Nathan; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 6542, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXIII, 654209 (May 14, 2007)-- May 14, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Type II superlattce photodetectors have recently experienced significant improvements in both theoretical structure design and experimental realization. Empirical Tight Binding Method is initiated and developed for Type II superlattice. Growth characteristics such as group V segregation and incorporation phenomena are taken into account in the model and shown higher precision. A new Type II structure, called M-structure, is introduced and theoretically demonstrated high R0A, high quantum efficiency. Device design is optimized to improve the performance. As a result, 55% quantum efficiency and 10 Ohm·cm² R0A are achieved for an 11.7 μm cut-off photodetector at 77K. FPA imaging at longwavelength is demonstrated with a capability of imaging up to 171K. At 81K, the noise equivalent temperature difference presented a peak at 0.33K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-Power CW Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
J.R. Meyer, W.W. Bewley, J.R. Lindle, I. Vurgaftman, A.J. Evans, J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the cw operation of quantum cascade lasers that do not require cryogenic cooling and emit at λ = 4.7-6.2 µm. At 200 K, more than 1 W of output power is obtained from 12-µm-wide stripes, with a wall-plug efficiency (ηwall) near 10%. Room-temperature cw operation has also been demonstrated, with a maximum output power of 640 mW (ηwall = 4.5%) at 6 µm and 260 mW (ηwall = 2.3%) at 4.8 µm. Far-field characterization indicates that whereas the beam quality remains close to the diffraction limit in all of the tested lasers, in the devices emitting at 6.2 µm the beam tends to steer by as much as 5-10° degrees in either direction with varying temperature and pump current. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High performance quantum cascade lasers (~11 μm) operating at high temperature (T>= 425K)
A. Tahraoui, A. Matlis, S. Slivken, J. Diaz, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 78 (4)-- January 22, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
We report record-low threshold current density and high output power for λ ∼ 11 μm Al0.48In0.52As/Ga0.47In0.53As quantum cascade lasers operating up to 425 K. The threshold current density is 1.1, 3.83, and 7.08 kA/cm² at 80, 300, and 425 K, respectively, for 5 μs pulses at a 200 Hz repetition rate. The cavity length is 3 mm with a stripe width of 20 μm. The maximum peak output power per facet is 1 W at 80 K, 0.5 W at 300 K, and more than 75 mW at 425 K. The characteristic temperature of these lasers is 174 K between 80 and 300 K and 218 K in the range of 300–425 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Power 0.98 μm GaInAs/GaAs/GaInP Multiple Quantum Well Laser
K. Mobarhan, M. Razeghi, G. Marquebielle and E. Vassilaki
Journal of Applied Physics 72 (9)-- November 1, 1992 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the fabrication of high quality Ga0.8In0.2As/GaAs/Ga0.51In0.49P multiple quantum well laser emitting at 0.98 μm grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Continuous wave operation with output power of 500 mW per facet was achieved at room temperature for a broad area laser with 130 μm width and 300 μm cavity length. This is an unusually high value of output power for this wavelength laser in this material system. The differential quantum efficiency exceeded 75% with excellent homogeneity and uniformity. The characteristic temperature, T0 was in the range of 120–130 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Growth of In1-xTlxSb, a New Infrared Material, by Low-Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
Y.H. Choi, R. Sudharsanan, C, Besikci, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 63 (3)-- July 19, 1993 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the growth of In1-xTlxSb, a new III-V alloy for long-wavelength infrared detector applications, by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. In1-xTlxSb with good surface morphology was obtained on both GaAs and InSb substrates at a growth temperature of 455 °C. X-ray diffraction measurements showed resolved peaks of In1-xTlxSb and InSb films. Infrared absorption spectrum of In1-xTlxSb showed a shift toward lower energies compared to InSb spectrum. Hall mobility data on In1-xTlxSb/InSb/GaAs structure showed enhanced mobility at low temperatures compared to InSb/GaAs structure. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Very high performance LWIR and VLWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with M-structure barrier
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 7082, San Diego, CA 2008, p. 708205-- September 3, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
LWIR and VLWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors have for long time suffered from a high dark current level and a low dynamic resistance which hampers the its emergence to the infrared detection and imaging industry. However, with the use of M-structure superlattice, a new Type-II binary InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattice design, as an effective blocking barrier, the dark current in type-II superlattice diode has been significantly reduced. We have obtained comparable differential resistance product to the MCT technology at the cut-off wavelength of 10 and 14μm. Also, this new design is compatible with the optical optimization scheme, leading to high quantum efficiency, high special detectivity devices for photon detectors and focal plane arrays. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Substrate removal for high quantum efficiency back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb photodetectors
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 23, p. 231106-- December 3, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
A substrate removal technique using an InAsSb etch stop layer improves by a factor of 2 the quantum efficiency of back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors. After etching of the GaSb substrate with a CrO3 based solution, the quantum efficiency of the diodes presents Fabry-Pérot oscillations averaging at 56%. Due to the confinement of the infrared light inside the devices, the quantum efficiency for certain devices reaches 75% at 8.5 µm. The implementation of this new technique to a focal plane array resulted in a decrease of the integration time from 0.23 to 0.08 ms. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  A Crystallographic Model of (00*1) Aluminum Nitride Epitaxial Thin Film Growth on (00*1) Sapphire Substrate
C.J. Sun, P. Kung, A. Saxler, H. Ohsato, M. Razeghi, and K. Haritos
Journal of Applied Physics 75 (8)-- April 15, 1994 ...[Visit Journal]
A direct comparison of the physical properties of GaN thin films is made as a function of the choice of substrate orientations. Gallium nitride single crystals were grown on (0001) and (011-bar 2) sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Better crystallinity with fine ridgelike facets is obtained on the (011-bar 2) sapphire. Also lower carrier concentration and higher mobilities indicate both lower nitrogen vacancies and less oxygen incorporation on the (011-bar 2) sapphire. The results of this study show better physical properties of GaN thin films achieved on (011-bar 2) sapphire. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-Power Continuous-Wave Operation of Quantum-Cascade Lasers Up to 60 °C
J.S. Yu, A. Evans, J. David, L. Doris, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, 16 (3)-- March 1, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
High-temperature high-power continuous-wave (CW) operation of high-reflectivity-coated 12 μm wide quantum-cascade lasers emitting at λ = 6 μm with a thick electroplated Au top contact layer is reported for different cavity lengths. For a 3 mm long laser, the CW optical output powers of 381 mW at 293 K and 22 mW at maximum operating temperature of 333 K (60°C) are achieved with threshold current densities of 1.93 and 3.09 kA/cm2, respectively. At 298 K, the same cavity gives a maximum wall plug efficiency of 3.17% at 1.07 A. An even higher CW optical output power of 424 mW at 293 K is obtained for a 4-mm-long laser and the device also operates up to 332 K with an output power of 14 mW. Thermal resistance is also analyzed at threshold as a function of cavity length. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Performance Quantum Cascade Lasers Grown by Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy
M. Razeghi, S. Slivken, A. Tahraoui and A. Matlis
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, -- January 22, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent improvements in quantum cascade laser technology have led to a number of very impressive results. This paper is a brief summary of the technological development and state-of- the-art performance of quantum cascade lasers produced at the Center for Quantum Devices. Laser design will be discussed, as well as experimental details of device fabrication. Room temperature QCL operation has been reported for lasers emitting between 5 - 11 μm, with 9 - 11 μm lasers operating up to 425 K. We also demonstrate record room temperature peak output powers at 9 and 11 μm(2.5 W and 1 W respectively) as well as record low 80 K threshold current densities (250 A/cm²) for some laser designs. Finally, some of the current limitations to laser efficiency are mentioned, as well as a means to combat them. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Optical Investigations of GaAs-GaInP Quantum Wells Grown on the GaAs, InP, and Si Substrates
H. Xiaoguang, M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 61 (14)-- October 5, 1992 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the first photoluminescence investigation of GaAs‐Ga0.51In0.49P lattice matched multiquantum wells grown by the low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition simultaneously in the same run on GaAs, Si, and InP substrates. The sharp photoluminescence peaks indicate the high quality of the samples on three different substrates. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence indicates that the intrinsic excitonic transitions dominate at low temperature and free‐carrier recombinations at room temperature. The photoluminescence peaks of the samples grown on Si and InP substrates shift about 15 meV from the corresponding peaks of the sample grown on the GaAs substrate. Two possible interpretations are provided for the observed energy shift. One is the diffusion of In along the dislocation threads from GaInP to GaAs and another is the localized strain induced by defects and In segregations. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Anomalous Hall Effect in InSb Layers Grown by MOCVD on GaAs Substrates
C. Besikci, Y.H. Choi, R. Sudharsanan, and M. Razeghi
Journal of Applied Physics 73 (10)-- May 15, 1993 ...[Visit Journal]
InSb epitaxial layers have been grown on GaAs substrates by low‐pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A 3.15 μm thick film yielded an x‐ray full width at half maximum of 171 arcsec. A Hall mobility of 76  200 cm²/V· s at 240 K and a full width at half maximum of 174 arcsec have been measured for a 4.85 μm thick epilayer. Measured Hall data have shown anomalous behavior. A decrease in Hall mobility with decreasing temperature has been observed and room‐temperature Hall mobility has increased with thickness. In order to explain the anomalous Hall data, and the thickness dependence of the measured parameters, the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility have been simulated using a three‐layer model including a surface layer, a bulklike layer, and an interface layer with a high density of defects. Theoretical analysis has shown that anomalous behavior can be attributed to donor-like defects caused by the large lattice mismatch and to a surface layer which dominates the transport in the material at low temperatures.   [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  AlxGa1-xN-based back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors with external quantum efficiency of 89%
E. Cicek, R. McClintock, C. Y. Cho, B. Rahnema, and M. Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 191108 (2013)-- November 5, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on high performance AlxGa1−xN-based solar-blind ultraviolet photodetector (PD) array grown on sapphire substrate. First, high quality, crack-free AlN template layer is grown via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Then, we systematically optimized the device design and material doping through the growth and processing of multiple devices. After optimization, uniform and solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array; at the peak detection wavelength of 275 nm, 729 μm² area PD showed unbiased peak external quantum efficiency and responsivity of ∼80% and ∼176 mA/W, respectively, increasing to 89% under 5 V of reverse bias. Taking the reflection loses into consideration, the internal quantum efficiency of these optimized PD can be estimated to be as high as ∼98%. The visible rejection ratio measured to be more than six orders of magnitude. Electrical measurements yielded a low-dark current density: <2 × 10−9 A/cm², at 10 V of reverse bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Transport and Photodetection in Self-Assembled Semiconductor Quantum Dots
M. Razeghi, H. Lim, S. Tsao, J. Szafraniec, W. Zhang, K. Mi, and B. Movaghar
Nanotechnology, 16-- January 7, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
A great step forward in science and technology was made when it was discovered that lattice mismatch can be used to grow highly ordered, artificial atom-like structures called self-assembled quantum dots. Several groups have in the meantime successfully demonstrated useful infrared photodetection devices which are based on this technology. The new physics is fascinating, and there is no doubt that many new applications will be found when we have developed a better understanding of the underlying physical processes, and in particular when we have learned how to integrate the exciting new developments made in nanoscopic addressing and molecular self-assembly methods with semiconducting dots. In this paper we examine the scientific and technical questions encountered in current state of the art infrared detector technology and suggest ways of overcoming these difficulties. Promoting simple physical pictures, we focus in particular on the problem of high temperature detector operation and discuss the origin of dark current, noise, and photoresponse. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Demonstration of mid-infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes grown on GaAs substrate
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, E.K. Huang, S. Bogdanov, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 94, No. 22-- June 8, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the growth and characterization of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes grown on a GaAs substrate. Through a low nucleation temperature and a reduced growth rate, a smooth GaSb surface was obtained on the GaAs substrate with clear atomic steps and low roughness morphology. On the top of the GaSb buffer, a p+-i-n+ type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiode was grown with a designed cutoff wavelength of 4 μm. The detector exhibited a differential resistance at zero bias (R0A)in excess of 1600 Ω·cm2 and a quantum efficiency of 36.4% at 77 K, providing a specific detectivity of 6 X 1011 cm·Hz½/W and a background limited operating temperature of 100 K with a 300 K background. Uncooled detectors showed similar performance to those grown on GaSb substrates with a carrier lifetime of 110 ns and a detectivity of 6 X 108 cm·Hz½/W. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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