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3.  Recent Advances in Room Temperature, High-Power Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Sources Based on Difference-Frequency Generation
Quanyong Lu and Manijeh Razeghi
Photonics, 3, 42 (2016)-- July 7, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
We present the current status of high-performance, compact, THz sources based on intracavity nonlinear frequency generation in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Significant performance improvements of our THz sources in the power and wall plug efficiency are achieved by systematic optimizing the device’s active region, waveguide, and chip bonding strategy. High THz power up to 1.9 mW and 0.014 mW for pulsed mode and continuous wave operations at room temperature are demonstrated, respectively. Even higher power and efficiency are envisioned based on enhancements in outcoupling efficiency and mid-IR performance. Our compact THz device with high power and wide tuning range is highly suitable for imaging, sensing, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, and many other applications. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays for High-Performance Third Generation Infrared Imaging and Free-Space Communication
M. Razeghi, A. Hood and A. Evans
SPIE Conference, January 25-29, 2007, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits IX, Vol. 6476, p. 64760Q-1-9-- January 29, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Free-space optical communications has recently been touted as a solution to the "last mile" bottleneck of high speed data networks providing highly secure, short to long range, and high bandwidth connections. However, commercial near infrared systems experience atmospheric scattering losses and scintillation effects which can adversely affect a link's uptime. By moving the operating wavelength into the mid or long wavelength infrared enhanced link uptimes and increased range can be achieved due to less susceptibility atmospheric affects. The combination of room temperature, continuous wave' high power quantum cascade lasers and high operating temperature Type-II superlattice photodetectors offers the benefits of mid and long wavelength infrared systems as well as practical operating conditions. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Reliable GaN-based resonant tunneling diodes with reproducible room-temperature negative differential resistance
C. Bayram, D.K. Sadana, Z. Vashaei and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8268, p. 826827-- January 22, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
negative differential resistance (NDR). Compared to other negative resistance devices such as (Esaki) tunnel and transferred-electron devices, RTDs operate much faster and at higher temperatures. III-nitride materials, composed of AlGaInN alloys, have wide bandgap, high carrier mobility and thermal stability; making them ideal for high power high frequency RTDs. Moreover, larger conduction band discontinuity promise higher NDR than other materials (such as GaAs) and room-temperature operation. However, earlier efforts on GaN-based RTD structures have failed to achieve a reliable and reproducible NDR. Recently, we have demonstrated for the first time that minimizing dislocation density and eliminating the piezoelectric fields enable reliable and reproducible NDR in GaN-based RTDs even at room temperature. Observation of NDR under both forward and reverse bias as well as at room and low temperatures attribute the NDR behaviour to quantum tunneling. This demonstration marks an important milestone in exploring III-nitride quantum devices, and will pave the way towards fundamental quantum transport studies as well as for high frequency optoelectronic devices such as terahertz emitters based on oscillators and cascading structures. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Electrically pumped photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers
Y. Bai, P. Sung, S.R. Darvish, W. Zhang, A. Evans, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000A-1-8.-- February 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate electrically pumped, room temperature, single mode operation of photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) quantum cascade lasers emitting at ~ 4.75 µm. Ridge waveguides of 50 µm and 100 µm width were fabricated with both PCDFB and Fabry-Perot feedback mechanisms. The Fabry-Perot device has a broad emitting spectrum and a broad far-field character. The PCDFB devices have primarily a single spectral mode and a diffraction limited far field characteristic with a full angular width at half-maximum of 4.8 degrees and 2.4 degrees for the 50 µm and 100 µm ridge widths, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High operating temperature 320 x 256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array imaging based on an InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum dot infrared photodetector
S. Tsao, H. Lim, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 20, p. 201109-- May 14, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
This letter reports a 320×256 middle-wavelength infrared focal plane array operating at temperatures up to 200 K based on an InAs quantum dot/InGaAs quantum well/InAlAs barrier detector grown on InP substrate by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The device's low dark current density and the persistence of the photocurrent up to room temperature enabled the high temperature imaging. The focal plane array had a peak detection wavelength of 4 µm, a responsivity of 34 mA/W, a conversion efficiency of 1.1%, and a noise equivalent temperature difference of 344 mK at an operating temperature of 120 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High operating temperature MWIR photon detectors based on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice
M. Razeghi, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, S. Abdollahi Pour, E.K.W. Huang, P. Manukar, S. Bogdanov, and G. Chen
SPIE Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (January 22-28, 2010), Vol. 7608, p. 76081Q-1-- January 22, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent efforts have been paid to elevate the operating temperature of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice Mid Infrared photon detectors. Optimized growth parameters and interface engineering technique enable high quality material with a quantum efficiency above 50%. Intensive study on device architecture and doping profile has resulted in almost one order of magnitude of improvement to the electrical performance and lifted up the 300 K-background BLIP operation temperature to 166 K. At 77 K, the ~4.2 µm cut-off devices exhibit a differential resistance area product in excess of the measurement system limit (106 Ω·cm²) and a detectivity of 3x1013 cm·Hz½·W−1. High quality focal plane arrays were demonstrated with a noise equivalent temperature of 10 mK at 77 K. Uncooled camera is capable to capture hot objects such as soldering iron. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Continuous operation of a monolithic semiconductor terahertz source at room temperature
Q. Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai, and M. Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 221105 (2014)-- June 3, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate room temperature continuous wave THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with Čerenkov phase-matching scheme is used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance the heat dissipation for continuous wave operation. Continuous emission at 3.6 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio of 20 dB and output power up to 3 μW are achieved, respectively. THz peak power is further scaled up to 1.4 mW in pulsed mode by increasing the mid-infrared power through increasing the active region doping and device area. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Room temperature compact THz sources based on quantum cascade laser technology
M. Razeghi; Q.Y. Lu; N. Bandyopadhyay; S. Slivken; Y. Bai
Proc. SPIE 8846, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications IV, 884602 (September 24, 2013)-- November 24, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We present the high performance THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Room temperature single-mode operation in a wide THz spectral range of 1-4.6 THz is demonstrated from our Čerenkov phase-matched THz sources with dual-period DFB gratings. High THz power up to 215 μW at 3.5 THz is demonstrated via epi-down mounting of our THz device. The rapid development renders this type of THz sources promising local oscillators for many astronomical and medical applications. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Sampled grating, distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers with broad tunability and continuous operation at room temperature
S. Slivken, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Tsao, S. Nida, Y. Bai, Q.Y. Lu and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 100, No. 26, p. 261112-1-- June 25, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
A dual-section, single-mode quantum cascade laser is demonstrated in continuous wave at room temperature with up to 114 nm (50 cm−1) of tuning near a wavelength of 4.8 μm. Power above 100 mW is demonstrated, with a mean side mode suppression ratio of 24 dB. By changing the grating period, 270 nm (120 cm−1) of gap-free electrical tuning for a single gain medium has been realized. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  InSb Infrared Photodetectors on Si Substrates Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy
E. Michel, J. Xu, J.D. Kim, I. Ferguson, and M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 8 (5) pp. 673-- May 1, 1996 ...[Visit Journal]
The InSb infrared photodetectors grown heteroepitaxially on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are reported. Excellent InSb material quality is obtained on 3-in Si substrates (with a GaAs predeposition) as confirmed by structural, optical, and electrical analysis. InSb infrared photodetectors on Si substrates that can operate from 77 K to room temperature have been demonstrated. The peak voltage-responsitivity at 4 μm is about 1.0×103 V/W and the corresponding Johnson-noise-limited detectivity is calculated to be 2.8×1010 cm·Hz½/W. This is the first important stage in developing InSb detector arrays or monolithic focal plane arrays (FPAs) on silicon. The development of this technology could provide a challenge to traditional hybrid FPA's in the future. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Surface leakage investigation via gated type-II InAs/GaSb long-wavelength infrared photodetectors
G. Chen, E.K. Huang, A.M. Hoang, S. Bogdanov, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 101, No. 21, p. 213501-1-- November 19, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
By using gating technique, surface leakage generated by SiO2 passivation in long-wavelength infrared type-II superlattice photodetector is suppressed, and different surface leakage mechanisms are disclosed. By reducing the SiO2 passivation layer thickness, the saturated gated bias is reduced to −4.5 V. At 77 K, dark current densities of gated devices are reduced by more than 2 orders of magnitude, with 3071 Ω·cm² differential-resistance-area product at −100 mV. With quantum efficiency of 50%, the 11 μm 50% cut-off gated photodiode has a specific detectivity of 7 × 1011 Jones, and the detectivity stays above 2 × 1011 Jones from 0 to −500 mV operation bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Near milliwatt power AlGaN-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes based on lateral epitaxial overgrowth of AlN on Si(111)
Y. Zhang, S. Gautier, C. Cho, E. Cicek, Z, Vashaei, R. McClintock, C. Bayram, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 102, No. 1, p. 011106-1-- January 7, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the growth, fabrication, and device characterization of AlGaN-based thin-film ultraviolet (UV) (λ ∼ 359 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs). First, AlN/Si(111) template is patterned. Then, a fully coalesced 7-μm-thick lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of AlN layer is realized on patterned AlN/Si(111) template followed by UV LED epi-regrowth. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is employed to optimize LEO AlN and UV LED epitaxy. Back-emission UV LEDs are fabricated and flip-chip bonded to AlN heat sinks followed by Si(111) substrate removal. A peak pulsed power and slope efficiency of ∼0.6 mW and ∼1.3 μW/mA are demonstrated from these thin-film UV LEDs, respectively. For comparison, top-emission UV LEDs are fabricated and back-emission LEDs are shown to extract 50% more light than top-emission ones. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of antimonide infrared lasers and detectors
Chuanle Zhou, I. Vurgaftman, C. L. Canedy, C. S. Kim, M. Kim, W. W. Bewley, C. D. Merritt, J. Abell, J. R. Meyer, A. Hoang, A. Haddadi, M. Razeghi, and M. Grayson
Optical Materials Express. 2013;3(10):1632-1640.-- October 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
The in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the cladding layers and active quantum wells of interband cascade lasers and type-II superlattice infrared detector are measured by the 2-wire 3ω method. The layers investigated include InAs/AlSb superlattice cladding layers, InAs/GaInSb/InAs/AlSb W-active quantum wells, an InAs/GaSb superlattice absorber, an InAs/GaSb/AlSb M-structure, and an AlAsSb digital alloy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the InAs/AlSb superlattice is 4-5 times higher than the cross-plane value. The isotropic thermal conductivity of the AlAsSb digital alloy matches a theoretical expectation, but it is one order of magnitude lower than the only previously-reported experimental value. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Recent advances in high performance antimonide-based superlattice FPAs
E.K. Huang, B.M. Nguyen, S.R. Darvish, S. Abdollahi Pour, G. Chen, A. Haddadi, and M.A. Hoang
SPIE Proceedings, Infrared technology and Applications XXXVII, Orlando, FL, Vol. 8012, p. 80120T-1-- April 25, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Infrared detection technologies entering the third generation demand performances for higher detectivity, higher operating temperature, higher resolution and multi-color detection, all accomplished with better yield and lower manufacturing/operating costs. Type-II antimonide based superlattices (T2SL) are making firm steps toward the new era of focal plane array imaging as witnessed in the unique advantages and significant progress achieved in recent years. In this talk, we will present the four research themes towards third generation imagers based on T2SL at the Center for Quantum Devices. High performance LWIR megapixel focal plane arrays (FPAs) are demonstrated at 80K with an NEDT of 23.6 mK using f/2 optics, an integration time of 0.13 ms and a 300 K background. MWIR and LWIR FPAs on non-native GaAs substrates are demonstrated as a proof of concept for the cost reduction and mass production of this technology. In the MWIR regime, progress has been made to elevate the operating temperature of the device, in order to avoid the burden of liquid nitrogen cooling. We have demonstrated a quantum efficiency above 50%, and a specific detectivity of 1.05x1012 cm·Hz1/2/W at 150 K for 4.2 μm cut-off single element devices. Progress on LWIR/LWIR dual color FPAs as well as novel approaches for FPA fabrication will also be discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Demonstration of 256x256 Focal Plane Arrays Based on Al-free GaInAs/InP QWIP
J. Jiang, K. Mi, R. McClintock, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and C. Jelen
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 15 (9)-- September 1, 2003 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the first demonstration of an infrared focal plane array based on aluminum-free GaInAs-InP quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs).A unique positive lithography method was developed to perform indium-bump liftoff. The noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) of 29 mK was achieved at 70 K with f/2 optics. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Advances in UV sensitive visible blind GaN-based APDs
M. Ulmer, R. McClintock and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (January 22-27, 2011), Vol. 7945, p. 79451G-- January 23, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
In this paper, we describe our current state-of-the-art process of making visible-blind APDs based on GaN. We have grown our material on both conventional sapphire and low dislocation density free-standing c- and m-plane GaN substrates. Leakage current, gain, and single photon detection efficiency (SPDE) of these APDs are compared. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance of UV APDs are studied under low photon fluxes. Single photon detection capabilities with over 30% are demonstrated. We show how with pulse height discrimination the Geiger-mode operation conditions can be optimized for enhanced SPDE versus dark counts. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Low irradiance background limited type-II superlattice MWIR M-barrier imager
E.K. Huang, S. Abdollahi Pour, M.A. Hoang, A. Haddadi, M. Razeghi and M.Z. Tidrow
OSA Optics Letters (OL), Vol. 37, No. 11, p. 2025-2027-- June 1, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a type-II superlattice mid-wave infrared 320 × 256 imager at 81 K with the M-barrier design that achieved background limited performance (BLIP) and ∼99%operability. The 280 K blackbody’s photon irradiance was limited by an aperture and a band-pass filter from 3.6 μm to 3.8 μm resulting in a total flux of ∼5 × 1012 ph·cm−2·s−1. Under these low-light conditions, and consequently the use of a 13.5 ms integration time, the imager was observed to be BLIP thanks to a ∼5 pA dark current from the 27 μm wide pixels. The total noise was dominated by the photon flux and read-out circuit which gave the imager a noise equivalent input of ∼5 × 1010 ph·cm−2·s−1 and temperature sensitivity of 9 mK with F∕2.3 optics. Excellent imagery obtained using a 1-point correction alludes to the array’s uniform responsivity. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Comparison of ultraviolet APDs grown on free-standing GaN and sapphire substrates
E. Cicek, Z. Vashaei, C. Bayram, R. McClintock, M. Razeghi and M. Ulmer
Proceedings, Vol. 7780, p. 77801P, SPIE Optics and Photonics Symposium, Conference on Detectors and Imaging Devices: Infrared, Focal Plane and Single Photon, San Diego, CA -- August 4, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
There is a need for semiconductor-based ultraviolet photodetectors to support avalanche gain in order to realize better performance andmore effective compete with existing technologies. Wide bandgap III-Nitride semiconductors are the promising material system for the development of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that could be a viable alternative to current bulky UV detectors such as photomultiplier tubes. In this paper, we review the current state-of-the-art in IIINitride visible-blind APDs, and present our latest results on GaN APDs grown on both conventional sapphire and low dislocation density free-standing c- and m-plane GaN substrates. Leakage current, gain, and single photon detection efficiency (SPDE) of these APDs were compared. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance of UV APDs are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities as much as 30% being demonstrated in smaller devices. Geiger-mode operation conditions are optimized for enhanced SPDE. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Gallium nitride on silicon for consumer & scalable photonics
C. Bayram, K.T. Shiu, Y. Zhu, C.W. Cheng, D.K. Sadana, Z. Vashaei, E. Cicek, R. McClintock and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8631, p. 863112-1, Photonics West, San Francisco, CA-- February 4, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Gallium Nitride (GaN) is a unique material system that has been heavily exploited for photonic devices thanks to ultraviolet-to-terahertz spectral tunability. However, without a cost effective approach, GaN technology is limited to laboratory demonstrations and niche applications. In this investigation, integration of GaN on Silicon (100) substrates is attempted to enable widespread application of GaN based optoelectronics. Controlled local epitaxy of wurtzite phase GaN on on-axis Si(100) substrates is demonstrated via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). CMOS-compatible fabrication scheme is used to realize [SiO2-Si{111}-Si{100}] groove structures on conventional 200-mm Si(100) substrates. MOCVD growth (surface treatment, nucleation, initiation) conditions are studied to achieve controlled GaN epitaxy on such grooved Si(100) substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques are used to determine uniformity and defectivity of the GaN. Our results show that aforementioned groove structures along with optimized MOCVD growth conditions can be used to achieve controlled local epitaxy of wurtzite phase GaN on on-axis Si(100) substrates. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High power, continuous wave, room temperature operation of λ ~ 3.4 μm and λ ~ 3.55 μm InP-based quantum cascade lasers
N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 100, No. 21, p. 212104-1-- May 21, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report two highly strain-balanced InP-based AlInAs/GaInAs quantum cascade lasers emitting near 3.39 and 3.56 . A pulsed threshold current density of only 1.1 kA/cm² has been achieved at room temperature for both lasers with characteristic temperatures (T0) of 166  K and 152  K, respectively. The slope efficiency is also relatively temperature insensitive with characteristic temperatures (T1) of 116 K and 191  K, respectively. Continuous wave powers of 504 mW and 576 mW are obtained at room temperature, respectively. This was accomplished without buried ridge processing. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Optimizing facet coating of quantum cascade lasers for low power consumption
Y. Bai, S.R. Darvish, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 109, No. 5, p. 053103-1-- March 1, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Typical high power consumption (∼10 W) of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) has been a serious limitation for applications in battery powered systems. A partial high-reflection (PHR) coating technique is introduced for power downscaling with shorter cavity lengths. The PHR coating consists of a double layer dielectric of SiO2 and Ge. With this technique, a 4.6 μm QCL with an ultra low threshold power consumption of less than a watt (0.83 W) is demonstrated in room temperature continuous wave operation. At 25°C, the maximum output power and wall plug efficiency are 192 mW and 8.6%, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  GaN-based nanostructured photodetectors
J.L. Pau, C. Bayram, P. Giedraitis, R. McClintock, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Jose, CA Volume 7222-14-- January 26, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The use of nanostructures in semiconductor technology leads to the observation of new phenomena in device physics. Further quantum and non-quantum effects arise from the reduction of device dimension to a nanometric scale. In nanopillars, quantum confinement regime is only revealed when the lateral dimensions are lower than 50 nm. For larger mesoscopic systems, quantum effects are not observable but surface states play a key role and make the properties of nanostructured devices depart from those found in conventional devices. In this work, we present the fabrication of GaN nanostructured metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) and p-i-n photodiodes (PIN PDs) by e-beam lithography, as well as the investigation of their photoelectrical properties at room temperature. The nanopillar height and diameter are about 520 nm and 200 nm, respectively. MSMs present dark currents densities of 0.4 A/cm2 at ±100 V. A strong increase of the optical response with bias is observed, resulting in responsivities higher than 1 A/W. The relationship between this gain mechanism and surface states is discussed. PIN PDs yield peak responsivities (Rpeak) of 35 mA/W at -4 V and show an abnormal increase of the response (Rpeak > 100 A/W) under forward biases. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Hole-initiated multiplication in back-illuminated GaN avalanche photodiodes
R. McClintock, J.L. Pau, K. Minder, C. Bayram, P. Kung and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90 No. 14, p. 141112-1-- April 2, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Avalanche p-i-n photodiodes were fabricated on AlN templates for back illumination. Structures with different intrinsic layer thicknesses were tested. A critical electric field of 2.73 MV/cm was estimated from the variation of the breakdown voltage with thickness. From the device response under back and front illumination and the consequent selective injection of holes and electrons in the junction, ionization coefficients were obtained for GaN. The hole ionization coefficient was found to be higher than the electron ionization coefficient as predicted by theory. Excess multiplication noise factors were also calculated for back and front illumination, and indicated a higher noise contribution for electron injection. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Long-Wavelength InAsSb Photoconductors Operated at Near Room Temperatures (200-300 K)
J.D. Kim, D. Wu, J. Wojkowski, J. Piotrowski, J. Xu, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters., 68 (1),-- January 1, 1996 ...[Visit Journal]
Long-wavelength InAs1−xSbx photoconductors operated without cryogenic cooling are reported. The devices are based on p-InAs1−xSbx/p-InSb heterostructures grown on (100) semi-insulating GaAs substrates by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP‐MOCVD). Photoreponse up to 14 μm has been obtained in a sample with x=0.77 at 300 K, which is in good agreement with the measured infrared absorption spectra. The corresponding effective lifetime of ≊0.14 ns at 300 K has been derived from stationary photoconductivity. The Johnson noise limited detectivity at λ=10.6 μm is estimated to be about 3.27×107 cm· Hz½/W at 300 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Sandwich method to grow high quality AlN by MOCVD
Demir , H Li, Y Robin, R McClintock, S Elagoz and M Razeghi
IOP Publishing Ltd-- February 7, 2018 ...[Visit Journal]
We report pulsed atomic layer epitaxy growth of a very high crystalline quality, thick (~2 µm) and crack-free AlN material on c-plane sapphire substrates via a sandwich method using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. This sandwich method involves the introduction of a relatively low temperature (1050 °C) 1500 nm thick AlN layer between two 250 nm thick AlN layers which are grown at higher temperature (1170 °C). The surface morphology and crystalline quality remarkably improve using this sandwich method. A 2 µm thick AlN layer was realized with 33 arcsec and 136 arcsec full width at half maximum values for symmetric and asymmetric reflections of ω-scan, respectively, and it has an atomic force microscopy root-mean-square surface roughness of ~0.71 nm for a 5  ×  5 µm2 surface area. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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