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2.  Demonstration of 256x256 Focal Plane Arrays Based on Al-free GaInAs/InP QWIP
J. Jiang, K. Mi, R. McClintock, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and C. Jelen
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 15 (9)-- September 1, 2003 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the first demonstration of an infrared focal plane array based on aluminum-free GaInAs-InP quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs).A unique positive lithography method was developed to perform indium-bump liftoff. The noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) of 29 mK was achieved at 70 K with f/2 optics. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  On the performance and surface passivation of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes for the very-long- wavelength infrared
A. Hood, M. Razeghi, E. Aifer, G.J. Brown
Applied Physics Letters 87 (1)-- October 10, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate very-long-wavelength infrared Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with a cutoff wavelength (λc,50%) of 17 μm. We observed a zero-bias, peak Johnson noise-limited detectivity of 7.63×109 cm·Hz½/W at 77 K with a 90%-10% cutoff width of 17 meV, and quantum efficiency of 30%. Variable area diode zero-bias resistance-area product (R0A) measurements indicated that silicon dioxide passivation increased surface resistivity by nearly a factor of 5, over unpassivated photodiodes, and increased overall R0A uniformity. The bulk R0A at 77 K was found to be 0.08 Ω·cm2, with RA increasing more than twofold at 25 mV reverse bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High power, continuous wave, quantum cascade ring laser
Y. Bai, S. Tsao, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Q.Y. Lu, D. Caffey, M. Pushkarsky, T. Day and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 99, No. 26, p. 261104-1-- December 26, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate a quantum cascade ring laser with high power room temperature continuous wave operation. A second order distributed feedback grating buried inside the waveguide provides both in-plane feedback and vertical power outcoupling. Total output power reaches 0.51 W at an emission wavelength around 4.85 μm. Single mode operation persists up to 0.4 W. The far field analysis indicates that the device operates in a high order mode. The magnetic and electric components of the ring-shaped lasing beam are in radial and azimuthal directions, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High power frequency comb based on mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at λ ~9μm
Q. Y. Lu, M. Razeghi, S. Slivken, N. Bandyopadhyay, Y. Bai, W. J. Zhou, M. Chen, D. Heydari, A. Haddadi, R. McClintock, M. Amanti, and C. Sirtori
Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 051105 (2015)-- February 2, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
We investigate a frequency comb source based on a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at λ ∼9 μm with high power output. A broad flat-top gain with near-zero group velocity dispersion has been engineered using a dual-core active region structure. This favors the locking of the dispersed Fabry-Pérot modes into equally spaced frequency lines via four wave mixing. A current range with a narrow intermode beating linewidth of 3 kHz is identified with a fast detector and spectrum analyzer. This range corresponds to a broad spectral coverage of 65 cm−1 and a high power output of 180 mW for ∼176 comb modes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Recent advances in high performance antimonide-based superlattice FPAs
E.K. Huang, B.M. Nguyen, S.R. Darvish, S. Abdollahi Pour, G. Chen, A. Haddadi, and M.A. Hoang
SPIE Proceedings, Infrared technology and Applications XXXVII, Orlando, FL, Vol. 8012, p. 80120T-1-- April 25, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Infrared detection technologies entering the third generation demand performances for higher detectivity, higher operating temperature, higher resolution and multi-color detection, all accomplished with better yield and lower manufacturing/operating costs. Type-II antimonide based superlattices (T2SL) are making firm steps toward the new era of focal plane array imaging as witnessed in the unique advantages and significant progress achieved in recent years. In this talk, we will present the four research themes towards third generation imagers based on T2SL at the Center for Quantum Devices. High performance LWIR megapixel focal plane arrays (FPAs) are demonstrated at 80K with an NEDT of 23.6 mK using f/2 optics, an integration time of 0.13 ms and a 300 K background. MWIR and LWIR FPAs on non-native GaAs substrates are demonstrated as a proof of concept for the cost reduction and mass production of this technology. In the MWIR regime, progress has been made to elevate the operating temperature of the device, in order to avoid the burden of liquid nitrogen cooling. We have demonstrated a quantum efficiency above 50%, and a specific detectivity of 1.05x1012 cm·Hz1/2/W at 150 K for 4.2 μm cut-off single element devices. Progress on LWIR/LWIR dual color FPAs as well as novel approaches for FPA fabrication will also be discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Novel Method for Reclaim/Reuse of Bulk GaN Substrates using Sacrifical ZnO Release Layers
A. Rajan, S. Sundaram, Y. El Gmili, P. L. Voss, K. Pantzas, T. Moudakir, A. Ougazzaden, D. J. Rogers, F. Hosseini Teherani, V. E. Sandana, P. Bove, K. Prior, R. McClintock & M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8987, Oxide-based Materials and Devices V, 898719-- April 2, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
Free-standing (0002)-oriented GaN substrates (f = 2”) were coated with 200 nm of ZnO and used as templates for the growth of GaN thin films. SEM and AFM revealed that such GaN layers had a relatively homogenous surface morphology with an RMS roughness (5 μm x 5 μm) of less than 4nm. XRD studies revealed strained ZnO growth on the GaN substrate and the reproduction of the substrate rocking curve for the GaN overlayers after only a hundred nm of growth, thus indicating that the GaN films had superior crystallographic quality compared to those grown on sapphire or ZnO/sapphire substrates. Quarter-wafer areas of GaN were removed from the GaN substrate (by selective chemical etching away of the ZnO interlayer). The expensive GaN substrates were then reclaimed/reused (without the need for polishing) for a second cycle of ZnO and GaN growth, which gave similar XRD, SEM, CL and AFM results to the first cycle. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-Performance InP-Based Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
M. Razeghi
IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, Vol. 15, No. 3, May-June 2009, p. 941-951.-- June 5, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) were once considered as inefficient devices, as the wall-plug efficiency (WPE) was merely a few percent at room temperature. But this situation has changed in the past few years, as dramatic enhancements to the output power andWPE have been made for InP-based mid-IR QCLs. Room temperature continuous-wave (CW) output power as high as 2.8 W and WPE as high as 15% have now been demonstrated for individual devices. Along with the fundamental exploration of refining the design and improving the material quality, a consistent determination of important device performance parameters allows for strategically addressing each component that can be improved potentially. In this paper, we present quantitative experimental evidence backing up the strategies we have adopted to improve the WPE for QCLs with room temperature CW operation. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Very high performance LWIR and VLWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with M-structure barrier
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 7082, San Diego, CA 2008, p. 708205-- September 3, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
LWIR and VLWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors have for long time suffered from a high dark current level and a low dynamic resistance which hampers the its emergence to the infrared detection and imaging industry. However, with the use of M-structure superlattice, a new Type-II binary InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattice design, as an effective blocking barrier, the dark current in type-II superlattice diode has been significantly reduced. We have obtained comparable differential resistance product to the MCT technology at the cut-off wavelength of 10 and 14μm. Also, this new design is compatible with the optical optimization scheme, leading to high quantum efficiency, high special detectivity devices for photon detectors and focal plane arrays. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of antimonide infrared lasers and detectors
Chuanle Zhou, I. Vurgaftman, C. L. Canedy, C. S. Kim, M. Kim, W. W. Bewley, C. D. Merritt, J. Abell, J. R. Meyer, A. Hoang, A. Haddadi, M. Razeghi, and M. Grayson
Optical Materials Express. 2013;3(10):1632-1640.-- October 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
The in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the cladding layers and active quantum wells of interband cascade lasers and type-II superlattice infrared detector are measured by the 2-wire 3ω method. The layers investigated include InAs/AlSb superlattice cladding layers, InAs/GaInSb/InAs/AlSb W-active quantum wells, an InAs/GaSb superlattice absorber, an InAs/GaSb/AlSb M-structure, and an AlAsSb digital alloy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the InAs/AlSb superlattice is 4-5 times higher than the cross-plane value. The isotropic thermal conductivity of the AlAsSb digital alloy matches a theoretical expectation, but it is one order of magnitude lower than the only previously-reported experimental value. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-performance bias-selectable dual-band mid-/long-wavelength infrared photodetectors and focal plane arrays based on InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattices
M. Razeghi; A. Haddadi; A.M. Hoang; G. Chen; S. Ramezani-Darvish; P. Bijjam
Proc. SPIE 8704, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXIX, 87040S (June 11, 2013)-- June 11, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a bias selectable dual-band mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) co-located detector with 3 μm active region thickness per channel that is highly selective and can perform under high operating temperatures for the MWIR band. Under back-side illumination, a temperature evolution study of the MWIR detector's electro-optical performance found the 300 K background-limit with 2π field-of-view to be achieved below operating temperatures of 160 K, at which the temperature's 50% cutoff wavelength was 5.2 μm. The measured current reached the system limit of 0.1 pA at 110 K for 30 μm pixel-sized diodes. At 77 K, where the LWIR channel operated with a 50% cutoff wavelength at 11.2 μm, an LWIR selectivity of ∼17% was achieved in the MWIR wave band between 3 and 4.7 μm, making the detector highly selective. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High performance long wavelength infrared mega-pixel focal plane array based on type-II superlattices
P. Manurkar, S.R. Darvish, B.M. Nguyen, M. Razeghi and J. Hubbs
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No 19, p. 193505-1-- November 8, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
A large format 1k × 1k focal plane array (FPA) is realized using type-II superlattice photodiodes for long wavelength infrared detection. Material growth on a 3 in. GaSb substrate exhibits a 50% cutoff wavelength of 11 μm across the entire wafer. The FPA shows excellent imaging. Noise equivalent temperature differences of 23.6 mK at 81 K and 22.5 mK at 68 K are achieved with an integration time of 0.13 ms, a 300 K background and f/4 optics. We report a dark current density of 3.3×10−4 A·cm−2 and differential resistance-area product at zero bias R0A of 166 Ω·cm² at 81 K, and 5.1×10−5 A·cm−2 and 1286 Ω·cm², respectively, at 68 K. The quantum efficiency obtained is 78%. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Ammonium Sulfide Passivation of Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes
A. Gin, Y. Wei, A. Hood, A. Bajowala, V. Yazdanpanah, M. Razeghi and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, 84 (12)-- March 22, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the surface passivation of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors using various ammonium sulfide solutions. Compared to unpassivated detectors, zero-bias resistance of treated 400 µm×400 µm devices with 8 µm cutoff wavelength was improved by over an order of magnitude to ~20 kΩ at 80 K. Reverse-bias dark current density was reduced by approximately two orders of magnitude to less than 10 mA/cm2 at –2 V. Dark current modeling, which takes into account trap-assisted tunneling, indicates greater than 70 times reduction in bulk trap density for passivated detectors. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Polarization-free GaN emitters in the ultraviolet and visible spectra via heterointegration on CMOS-compatible Si (100)
C. Bayram, J. Ott, K. T. Shiu, C. W. Cheng, Y. Zhu, J. Kim, D. K. Sadana, M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9370, Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices XII, 93702F (February 8, 2015); -- February 8, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
This work presents a new type of polarization-free GaN emitter. The unique aspect of this work is that the ultraviolet and visible emission originates from the cubic phase GaN and the cubic phase InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells, respectively. Conventionally, GaN emitters (e.g. light emitting diodes, laser diodes) are wurtzite phase thus strong polarization fields exist across the structure contributing to the “droop” behavior – a phenomenon defined as “the reduction in emitter efficiency as injection current increases”. The elimination of piezoelectric fields in GaN-based emitters as proposed in this work provide the potential for achieving a 100% internal efficiency and might lead to droopfree light emitting diodes. In addition, this work demonstrates co-integration of GaN emitters on cheap and scalable CMOS-compatible Si (100) substrate, which yields possibility of realizing a GaN laser diode uniquely – via forming mirrors along the naturally occurring cubic phase GaN-Si(100) cleavage planes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Monolithic terahertz source
Q. Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Nature Photonics | Research Highlights -- July 31, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
To date, the production of continuous-wave terahertz (THz) sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers operating at room temperature has proved elusive. A critical problem is that, to achieve a large nonlinear susceptibility for frequency conversion, the active region of the quantum cascade laser requires high doping, which elevates the lasing threshold current density. Now, Quan-Yong Lu and colleagues from Northwestern University in the USA have overcome this problem and demonstrated a room-temperature continuous-wave THz source based on difference-frequency generation in quantum cascade lasers. They designed quantum-well structures based on In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As material system for two mid-infrared wavelengths. The average doping in the active region was about 2.5 × 1016 cm−3. A buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with the Čerenkov phase-matching scheme was used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance heat dissipation. As a result, single-mode emission at 3.6 THz was observed at 293 K. The continuous-wave THz power reached 3 μW with a conversion efficiency of 0.44 mW W−2 from mid-infrared to THz waves. Using a similar device design, a THz peak power of 1.4 mW was achieved in pulse mode. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High performance bias-selectable dual-band short-/mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices
A.M. Hoang, G. Chen, A. Haddadi and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8631, p. 86311K-1, Photonics West, San Francisco, CA-- February 5, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Active and passive imaging in a single camera based on the combination of short-wavelength and mid-wavelength infrared detection is highly needed in a number of tracking and reconnaissance missions. Due to its versatility in band-gap engineering, Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattice has emerged as a candidate highly suitable for this multi-spectral detection. In this paper, we report the demonstration of high performance bias-selectable dual-band short-/mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice with designed cut-off wavelengths of 2 μm and 4 μm. Taking advantages of the high performance short-wavelength and mid-wavelength single color photodetectors, back-to-back p-i-n-n-i-p photodiode structures were grown on GaSb substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. At 150 K, the short-wave channel exhibited a quantum efficiency of 55%, a dark current density of 1.0x10-9 A/cm² at -50 mV bias voltage, providing an associated shot noise detectivity of 3.0x1013 Jones. The mid-wavelength channel exhibited a quantum efficiency of 33% and a dark current density of 2.6x10-5 A/cm² at 300 mV bias voltage, resulting in a detectivity of 4.0x1011 Jones. The operations of the two absorber channels are selectable by changing the polarity of applied bias voltage. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  InAs/InAs1-XSbx Type-II Superlattices for High-Performance Long-Wavelength Infrared Medical Thermography
Manijeh Razeghi, Abbas Haddadi, Guanxi Chen, Romain Chevallier and Ahn Minh Hoang
ECS Trans. 2015 66(7): 109-116-- June 1, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
We present the demonstration of a high-performance long-wavelength infrared nBn photodetectors based on InAs/InAs1-xSbx type-II superlattices on GaSb substrate. The photodetector’s 50% cut-off wavelength was ~10 μm at 77K. The photodetector with a 6 μm-thick absorption region exhibited a peak responsivity of 4.47 A/W at 7.9 μm, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 54% at -90 mV applied bias voltage under front-side illumination and without any anti-reflection coating. With an R×A of 119 Ω·cm² and a dark current density of 4.4×10-4 A/cm² under -90 mV applied bias voltage at 77 K, the photodetector exhibited a specific detectivity of 2.8×1011 Jones. This photodetector opens a new horizon for making infrared imagers with higher sensitivity for medical thermography.
 
2.  The effect of doping the M-barrier in very long-wave type-II InAs/GaSb heterodiodes
D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and J. Pellegrino
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 3, p. 031107-1-- July 21, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
A variation on the standard homo-diode Type-II superlattice with an M-barrier between the pi-region and the n-region is shown to suppress the dark currents. By determining the optimal doping level of the M-superlattice, dark current densities of 4.95 mA·cm-2 and quantum efficiencies in excess of 20% have been demonstrated at the moderate reverse bias of 50 mV; allowing for near background-limited performance with a Johnson-noise detectivity of 3.11×1010 Jones at 77 K for a 14.58 µm cutoff wavelength for large area diodes without passivation. This is comparable to values for the state-of-the-art HgCdTe photodiodes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High power, continuous wave, room temperature operation of λ ~ 3.4 μm and λ ~ 3.55 μm InP-based quantum cascade lasers
N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 100, No. 21, p. 212104-1-- May 21, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report two highly strain-balanced InP-based AlInAs/GaInAs quantum cascade lasers emitting near 3.39 and 3.56 . A pulsed threshold current density of only 1.1 kA/cm² has been achieved at room temperature for both lasers with characteristic temperatures (T0) of 166  K and 152  K, respectively. The slope efficiency is also relatively temperature insensitive with characteristic temperatures (T1) of 116 K and 191  K, respectively. Continuous wave powers of 504 mW and 576 mW are obtained at room temperature, respectively. This was accomplished without buried ridge processing. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High differential resistance type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes for the long-wavelength infrared
A. Hood, D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, E. Michel and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 89 (9)-- August 28, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with a 50% cutoff wavelength ranging from 11 to 13 μm are presented. Optimization of diffusion limited photodiodes provided superlattice structures for improved injection efficiency in direct injection hybrid focal plane array applications. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  ZnO Thin Films & Nanostructures for Emerging Optoelectronic Applications
D.J. Rogers, F. Hosseini Teherani, V.E. Sandana, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (January 22-28, 2010), Vol. 7605, p. 76050K-1-- January 27, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
ZnO-based thin films and nanostructures grown by PLD for various emerging optoelectronic applications. AZO thin films are currently displacing ITO for many TCO applications due to recent improvements in attainable AZO conductivity combined with processing, cost and toxicity advantages. Advances in the channel mobilities and Id on/off ratios in ZnO-based TTFTs have opened up the potential for use as a replacement for a-Si in AM-OLED and AM-LCD screens. Angular-dependent specular reflection measurements of self-forming, moth-eye-like, nanostructure arrays grown by PLD were seen to have <0.5% reflectivity over the whole visible spectrum for angles of incidence between 10 and 60 degrees. Such nanostructures may be useful for applications such as AR coatings on solar cells. Compliant ZnO layers on mismatched/amorphous substrates were shown to have potential for MOVPE regrowth of GaN. This approach could be used as a means to facilitate lift-off of GaN-based LEDs from insulating sapphire substrates and could allow the growth of InGaN-based solar cells on cheap substrates. The green gap in InGaN-based LEDs was combated by substituting low Ts PLD n-ZnO for MOCVD n-GaN in inverted hybrid heterojunctions. This approach maintained the integrity of the InGaN MQWs and gave LEDs with green emission at just over 510 nm. Hybrid n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunctions were also seen to have the potential for UV (375 nm) EL, characteristic of ZnO NBE emission. This suggests that there was significant hole injection into the ZnO and that such LEDs could profit from the relatively high exciton binding energy of ZnO. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Demonstration of shortwavelength infrared photodiodes based on type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices
A.M. Hoang, G. Chen, A. Haddadi, S. Abdollahi Pour, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 100, No. 21, p. 211101-1-- May 21, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate the feasibility of the InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice photodiodes operating at the short wavelength infrared regime below 3  μm. An n-i-p type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb photodiode was grown with a designed cut-off wavelength of 2 μm on a GaSb substrate. At 150  K, the photodiode exhibited a dark current density of 5.6 × 10−8 A/cm² and a front-side-illuminated quantum efficiency of 40.3%, providing an associated shot noise detectivity of 1.0 × 1013 Jones. The uncooled photodiode showed a dark current density of 2.2 × 10−3 A/cm² and a quantum efficiency of 41.5%, resulting in a detectivity of 1.7 × 1010 Jones [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Room temperature terahertz quantum cascade laser sources with 215 μW output power through epilayer-down mounting
Q. Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai, and M. Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 011101 (2013)-- July 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report room temperature terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser sources with high power based on difference frequency generation. The device is Čerenkov phase matched and spectrally purified with an integrated dual-period distributed-feedback grating. Symmetric current injection and epilayer-down mounting of the device onto a patterned submount are used to improve the electrical uniformity and heat removal, respectively. The epilayer-down mounting also allows for THz anti-reflective coating to enhance the THz outcoupling efficiency. Single mode emission at 3.5 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio and output power up to 30 dB and 215  μW are obtained, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  III-Nitride Optoelectronic Devices: From Ultraviolet Toward Terahertz
M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Journal-Breakthroughs in Photonics 2010, Vol. 3, No. 2, p. 263-267-- April 26, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We review III-Nitride optoelectronic device technologies with an emphasis on recent breakthroughs. We start with a brief summary of historical accomplishments and then report the state-of-the-art in three key spectral regimes: (1) Ultraviolet (AlGaN-based avalanche photodiodes, single photon detectors, focal plane arrays, and light emitting diodes), (2) Visible (InGaN-based solid state lighting, lasers, and solar cells), and (3) Near-, mid-infrared, and terahertz (AlGaN/GaN-based gap-engineered intersubband devices). We also describe future trends in III-Nitride optoelectronic devices. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Continuous operation of a monolithic semiconductor terahertz source at room temperature
Q. Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai, and M. Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 221105 (2014)-- June 3, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate room temperature continuous wave THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with Čerenkov phase-matching scheme is used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance the heat dissipation for continuous wave operation. Continuous emission at 3.6 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio of 20 dB and output power up to 3 μW are achieved, respectively. THz peak power is further scaled up to 1.4 mW in pulsed mode by increasing the mid-infrared power through increasing the active region doping and device area. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Recent advances in LWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors and focal plane arrays at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi, D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, and M.Z. Tidrow
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 6940, Orlando, FL 2008, p. 694009-- March 17, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors have experienced significant improvements in material quality, structural designs, and imaging applications. They now appear to be a possible alternative to the state-of-the-art HgCdTe (MCT) technology in the long and very long wavelength infrared regimes. At the Center for Quantum Devices,we have successfully realized very high quantum efficiency, very high dynamic differential resistance R0A - product LWIR Type – II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with efficient surface passivation techniques. The demonstration of high quality LWIR Focal Plane Arrays that were 100 % fabricated in - house reaffirms the pioneer position of this university-based laboratory. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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