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1.  State-of-the-art Type II Antimonide-based superlattice photodiodes for infrared detection and imaging
M. Razeghi, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, S. Abdollahi Pour, P. Manurkar, and S. Bogdanov
SPIE Proceedings, Nanophotonics and Macrophotonics for Space Environments II, San Diego, CA, Vol. 7467, p. 74670T-1-- August 5, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice (SL), a system of multi interacting quantum wells was first introduced by Nobel Laureate L. Esaki in the 1970s. Since then, this low dimensional system has drawn a lot of attention for its attractive quantum mechanics properties and its grand potential for the emergence into the application world, especially in infrared detection. In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors have experienced significant improvements in material quality, structural designs and imaging applications which elevated the performances of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors to a comparable level to the state-of-the-art Mercury Cadmium Telluride. We will present in this talk the current status of the state-of-the-art Type II superlattice photodetectors and focal plane arrays, and the future outlook for this material system. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Long Wavelength Type-II Photodiodes Operating at Room Temperature
H. Mohseni and M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 13 (5)-- May 1, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
The operation of uncooled InAs-GaSb superlattice photodiodes with a cutoff wavelength of λc=8 μm and a peak detectivity of 1.2 × 108 cm·Hz½/W at zero bias is demonstrated. The detectivity is similar to the best uncooled HgCdTe detectors and microbolometers. However, the R0A product is more than two orders of magnitude higher than HgCdTe and the device is more than four orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. These features combined with their low 1/f noise and high uniformity make these type-II photodiodes an excellent choice for uncooled high-speed IR imaging arrays [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Gain-length scaling in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors
T. Yamanaka, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Kuboya, A. Myzaferi and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 9-- August 31, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The gain in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors is investigated. The scaling of the gain with device length has been analyzed, and the behavior agrees with the previously proposed model. We conclude that we understand the gain in the low bias region, but in the high field region, discrepancies remain. An extension of the gain model is presented to cover the very high electric field region. The high field data are compared to the extended model and discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High performance InGaAs/InGaP quantum dot infrared photodetector achieved through doping level optimization
S. Tsao, K. Mi, J. Szafraniec, W. Zhang, H. Lim, B. Movaghar, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp. 334-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report an InGaAs/InGaP/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with detectivity of 1.3x1011 cm·Hz½/W at 77K and 1.2x1010 ccm·Hz½/W at 120K. Modeling of the Quantum dot energy levels showed us that increased photoresponse could be obtained by doping the quantum dots to 4 electrons per dot instead of the usual 2 electrons per dot. This happens because the primary photocurrent transition is from the first excited state to a higher excited state. Increasing the quantum doping in our device yielded significant responsivity improvement and much higher detectivity as a result. This paper discusses the performance of this higher doping device and compares it to our previously reported device with lower doping. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High quantum efficiency two color type-II InAs/GaSb n-i-p-p-i-n photodiodes
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, A. Hood, E.K. Huang, M. Razeghi, and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, No. 11, p. 111112-1-- March 17, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
A n-i-p-p-i-n photodiode based on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice was grown on a GaSb substrate. The two channels, with respective 50% of responsivity cutoff wavelengths at 7.7 and 10 µm, presented quantum efficiencies (QEs) of 47% and 39% at 77 K. The devices can be operated as two diodes for simultaneous detection or as a single n-i-p-p-i-n detector for sequential detection. In the latter configuration, the QEs at 5.3 and 8.5 µm were measured as high as 40% and 39% at 77 K. The optical cross-talk between the two channels could be reduced from 0.36 to 0.08 by applying a 50 mV bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-Performance Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes with Cutoff Wavelength Around 7 µm
Y. Wei, A. Hood, H. Yau, V. Yazdanpanah, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and V. Nathan
Applied Physics Letters, 86 (9)-- February 28, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the most recent result in the area of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes that have a cutoff wavelength around 7 µm at 77 K. Superlattice with a period of 40 Å lattice matched to GaSb was realized using GaxIn1–x type interface engineering technique. Compared with significantly longer period superlattices, we have reduced the dark current density under reverse bias dramatically. For a 3 µm thick structure, using sulfide-based passivation, the dark current density reached 2.6×10–5 A/cm2 at –3 V reverse bias at 77 K. At this temperature the photodiodes have R0A of 9300 Ω·cm2 and a thermally limited zero bias detectivity of 1×1012 cm·Hz½/W. The 90%–10% cutoff energy width was only 16.5 meV. The devices did not show significant dark current change at 77 K after three months storage in the atmosphere. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Ultraviolet avalanche photodiodes
Ryan McClintock ; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9555, Optical Sensing, Imaging, and Photon Counting: Nanostructured Devices and Applications, 95550B -- August 28, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
The III-Nitride material system is rapidly maturing; having proved itself as a material for LEDs and laser, and now finding use in the area of UV photodetectors. However, many UV applications are still dominated by the use of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). PMTs are capable of obtaining very high sensitivity using internal electron multiplication gain (typically ~106). It is highly desirable to develop a compact semiconductor-based photodetector capable of realizing this level of sensitivity. In principle, this can be obtained in III-Nitrides by taking advantage of avalanche multiplication under high electric fields – typically 2.7 MV/cm, which with proper design can correspond to an external reverse bias of less than 100 volts. In this talk, we review the current state-of-the-art in III-Nitride solar- and visible-blind APDs, and present our latest results on GaN APDs grown on both conventional sapphire and low dislocation density free-standing c- and m-plane GaN substrates. Leakage current, gain, and single photon detection efficiency (SPDE) of these APDs were compared. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance of UV APDs are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities as much as 30% being demonstrated in smaller devices. Geiger-mode operation conditions are optimized for enhanced SPDE. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Stranski-Krastanov growth of InGaN quantum dots emitting in green spectra
C. Bayram and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics A: Materials Science and Processing, Vol. 96, No. 2, p. 403-408-- August 1, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
Self-assembled InGaN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on GaN templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. 2D–3D growth mode transition through Stranski–Krastanov mode was observed via atomic force microscopy. The critical thickness for In0.67Ga0.33N QDs was determined to be four monolayers. The effects of growth temperature, deposition thickness, and V/III ratio on QD formation were examined. The capping of InGaN QDs with GaN was analyzed. Optimized InGaN quantum dots emitted in green spectra at room temperature. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Transport and Photodetection in Self-Assembled Semiconductor Quantum Dots
M. Razeghi, H. Lim, S. Tsao, J. Szafraniec, W. Zhang, K. Mi, and B. Movaghar
Nanotechnology, 16-- January 7, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
A great step forward in science and technology was made when it was discovered that lattice mismatch can be used to grow highly ordered, artificial atom-like structures called self-assembled quantum dots. Several groups have in the meantime successfully demonstrated useful infrared photodetection devices which are based on this technology. The new physics is fascinating, and there is no doubt that many new applications will be found when we have developed a better understanding of the underlying physical processes, and in particular when we have learned how to integrate the exciting new developments made in nanoscopic addressing and molecular self-assembly methods with semiconducting dots. In this paper we examine the scientific and technical questions encountered in current state of the art infrared detector technology and suggest ways of overcoming these difficulties. Promoting simple physical pictures, we focus in particular on the problem of high temperature detector operation and discuss the origin of dark current, noise, and photoresponse. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Substrate removal for high quantum efficiency back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb photodetectors
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 23, p. 231106-- December 3, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
A substrate removal technique using an InAsSb etch stop layer improves by a factor of 2 the quantum efficiency of back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors. After etching of the GaSb substrate with a CrO3 based solution, the quantum efficiency of the diodes presents Fabry-Pérot oscillations averaging at 56%. Due to the confinement of the infrared light inside the devices, the quantum efficiency for certain devices reaches 75% at 8.5 µm. The implementation of this new technique to a focal plane array resulted in a decrease of the integration time from 0.23 to 0.08 ms. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Passivation of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors
A. Hood, Y. Wei, A. Gin, M. Razeghi, M. Tidrow, and V. Nathan
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp. 316-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Leakage currents limit the operation of high performance Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiode technology. Surface leakage current becomes a dominant limiting factor, especially at the scale of a focal plane array pixel (< 25 µm) and must be addressed. A reduction of the surface state density, unpinning the Fermi level at the surface, and appropriate termination of the semiconductor crystal are all aims of effective passivation. Recent work in the passivation of Type-II InAs\GaSb superlattice photodetectors with aqueous sulfur-based solutions has resulted in increased R0A products and reduced dark current densities by reducing the surface trap density. Additionally, photoluminescence of similarly passivated Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice and InAs GaSb bulk material will be discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Sb-based infrared materials and photodetectors for the near room temperature applications
J.D. Kim, E. Michel, H. Mohseni, J. Wojkowski, J.J. Lee and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 2999, pp. 55-- February 12, 1997 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the growth of InSb, InAsSb, and InTlSb alloys for infrared photodetector applications. The fabrication and characterization of photodetectors based on these materials are also reported. Both photoconductive and photovoltaic devices are investigated. The materials and detector structures were grown on (100) and (111)B semi-insulating GaAs and GaAs coated Si substrates by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Photoconductive detectors fabricated from InAsSb and InTlSb have been operated in the temperature range from 77 K to 300 K. The material parameters for photovoltaic device structures have been optimized through theoretical calculations based on fundamental mechanisms. InSb p-i-n photodiodes with 77 K peak responsivities approximately 103 V/W were grown on Si and (111) GaAs substrates. An InAsSb photovoltaic detector with a composition of x equals 0.85 showed photoresponse up to 13 micrometers at 300 K with a peak responsivity of 9.13 X 10-2 V/W at 8 micrometers . The RoA product of InAsSb detectors has been theoretically and experimentally analyzed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of antimonide infrared lasers and detectors
Chuanle Zhou, I. Vurgaftman, C. L. Canedy, C. S. Kim, M. Kim, W. W. Bewley, C. D. Merritt, J. Abell, J. R. Meyer, A. Hoang, A. Haddadi, M. Razeghi, and M. Grayson
Optical Materials Express. 2013;3(10):1632-1640.-- October 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
The in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the cladding layers and active quantum wells of interband cascade lasers and type-II superlattice infrared detector are measured by the 2-wire 3ω method. The layers investigated include InAs/AlSb superlattice cladding layers, InAs/GaInSb/InAs/AlSb W-active quantum wells, an InAs/GaSb superlattice absorber, an InAs/GaSb/AlSb M-structure, and an AlAsSb digital alloy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the InAs/AlSb superlattice is 4-5 times higher than the cross-plane value. The isotropic thermal conductivity of the AlAsSb digital alloy matches a theoretical expectation, but it is one order of magnitude lower than the only previously-reported experimental value. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Active and passive infrared imager based on short-wave and mid-wave type-II superlattice dual-band detectors
E.K. Huang, A. Haddadi, G. Chen, A.M. Hoang, and M. Razeghi
Optics Letters, Vol. 38, no. 1, p. 22-24-- January 1, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
A versatile dual-band detector capable of active and passive use is demonstrated using short-wave (SW) and midwave(MW) IR type-II superlattice photodiodes. A bilayer etch-stop scheme is introduced for back-side-illuminated detectors, which enhanced the external quantum efficiency both in the SWIR and MWIR spectral regions. Temperature-dependent dark current measurements of pixel-sized 27 μm detectors found the dark current density to be ~1 × 10-5 A/cm² for the ∼4.2 μm cutoff MWIR channel at 140 K. This corresponded to a reasonable imager noise equivalent difference in temperature of ∼49 mK using F∕2.3 optics and a 10 ms integration time (tint), which lowered to ∼13 mK at 110 K using tint  30 ms, illustrating the potential for high-temperature operation. The SWIR channel was found to be limited by readout noise below 150 K. Excellent imagery from the dual-band imager exemplifying pixel coincidence is shown. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Detectivity InGaAs/InGaP Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors Grown by Low Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, T. O'Sullivan, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T. Sills, K. Mi, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, 84 (12)-- April 22, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a high detectivity middle-wavelength infrared quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). The InGaAs quantum dots were grown by self-assembly on an InGaP matrix via low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Photoresponse was observed at temperatures above 200 K with a peak wavelength of 4.7 µm and cutoff wavelength of 5.2 µm. The background limited performance temperature was 140 K, and this was attributed to the super low dark current observed in this QDIP. A detectivity of 3.6×1010 cm·Hz½/W, which is comparable to the state-of-the-art quantum well infrared photodetectors in a similar wavelength range, was obtained for this InGaAs/InGaP QDIP at both T = 77 K and T = 95 K at biases of –1.6 and –1.4 V, [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Research activity on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice for LWIR detection and imaging at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi and B.M. Nguyen
American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings Vol. 949, Issue 1, p. 35-42, 6th International Workshop on Information Optics (WIO'07), Reykjavik, Iceland, June 25-30, 2007-- October 24, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Type-II superlattice photodetectors have recently experienced significant improvements in both theoretical structure design and experimental realization. Empirical Tight Binding Method was initiated and developed for Type-II superlattice. A new Type-II structure, called M-structure, was introduced and theoretically demonstrated high R0A, high quantum efficiency. Device design and growth condition were optimized to improve the performance. As a result, a 54% quantum efficiency, a 12 Ω·cm2 R0A were achieved for 11 µm cut-off photodetector at 77 K. Effective surface passivation techniques for MWIR and LWIR Type-II superlattice were developed. FPA imaging at MWIR and LWIR were demonstrated with a capability of imaging up to room temperature and 211 K respectively. The noise equivalent temperature difference presented a peak at 50 mK for MWIR FPA at 121 K and 26 mK for LWIR FPA at 81 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Watt level performance of quantum cascade lasers in room temperature continuous wave operation at λ ∼ 3.76 μm
N. Bandyopadhyay, Y. Bai, B. Gokden, A. Myzaferi, S. Tsao, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No. 13-- September 27, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP-based quantum cascade laser heterostructure emitting at 3.76 μm is grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The laser core is composed of strain balanced In0.76Ga0.24As/In0.26Al0.74As. Pulsed testing at room temperature exhibits a low threshold current density (1.5 kA/cm²) and high wall plug efficiency (10%). Room temperature continuous wave operation gives 6% wall plug efficiency with a maximum output power of 1.1 W. Continuous wave operation persists up to 95 °C. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  InAsSbP/InAsSb/InAs Laser Diodes λ = 3.2 μm) Grown by Low-Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
J. Diaz, G. Lukas, D. Wu, S. Kim, M. Erdtmann, E. Kaas, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 70 (1)-- January 6, 1997 ...[Visit Journal]
We report metal–organic chemical-vapor deposition-grown double heterostructure InAsSbP/InAsSb/InAs diode lasers emitting at 3.2 μm operating at temperatures up to 220 K with threshold current density of 40 A/cm² at 77 K and characteristic temperature up to 42 K. Output powers as high as 260 mW in pulse mode and 60 mW in continuous wave operation have been obtained from an uncoated 100 μm stripe-width broad-area laser at 77 K. Comparison with theory shows that there is no significant nonradiative recombination mechanism for these lasers at 77 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Room temperature continuous wave operation of λ ~ 3-3.2 μm quantum cascade lasers
N. Bandyopadhyay, Y. Bai, S. Tsao, S. Nida, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 101, No. 24, p. 241110-1-- December 10, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate quantum cascade lasers emitting at wavelengths of 3–3.2 μm in the InP-based material system. The laser core consists of GaInAs/AlInAs using strain balancing technique. In room temperature pulsed mode operation, threshold current densities of 1.66 kA∕cm² and 1.97 kA∕cm², and characteristic temperatures (T0) of 108 K and 102 K, are obtained for the devices emitting at 3.2 μm and 3 μm, respectively. Room temperature continuous wave operation is achieved at both wavelengths. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  320x256 Solar-Blind Focal Plane Arrays based on AlxGa1-xN
R. McClintock, K. Mayes, A. Yasan, D. Shiell, P. Kung, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 86 (1)-- January 3, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report AlGaN-based back-illuminated solar-blind ultraviolet focal plane arrays operating at a wavelength of 280 nm. The electrical characteristics of the individual pixels are discussed, and the uniformity of the array is presented. The p–i–n photodiode array was hybridized to a 320×256 read-out integrated circuit entirely within our university research lab, and a working 320×256 camera was demonstrated. Several example solar-blind images from the camera are also provided. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Recent advances in mid infrared (3-5 μm) quantum cascade lasers
Manijeh Razeghi; Neelanjan Bandyopadhyay; Yanbo Bai; Quanyong Lu; Steven Slivken
Optical Materials Express, Vol. 3, Issue 11, pp. 1872-1884 (2013)-- November 2, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is an important source of electromagnetic radiation in mid infrared region. Recent research in mid-IR QCLs has resulted in record high wallplug efficiency (WPE), high continuous wave (CW) output power, single mode operation and wide tunability. CW output power of 5.1 W with 21% WPE has been achieved at room temperature (RT). A record high WPE of 53% at 40K has been demonstrated. Operation wavelength of QCL in CW at RT has been extended to as short as 3μm. Very high peak power of 190 W has been obtained from a broad area QCL of ridge width 400μm. 2.4W RT, CW power output has been achieved from a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL. Wide tuning based on dual section sample grating DFB QCLs has resulted in individual tuning of 50cm-1 and 24 dB side mode suppression ratio with continuous wave power greater than 100 mW. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Highly selective two-color mid-wave and long-wave infrared detector hybrid based on Type-II superlattices
E.K. Huang, M.A. Hoang, G. Chen, S.R. Darvish, A. Haddadi, and M. Razeghi
Optics Letters, Vol. 37, No. 22, p. 4744-4746-- November 15, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a two-color mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) co-located detector with 3 μm active region thickness per channel that is highly selective and can perform under high operating temperatures for the MWIR band. Under back-side illumination, a temperature evolution study of the MWIR detector’s electro-optical performance found the 300 K background-limit with 2π field-of-view to be achieved below operating temperatures of 160 K, at which the temperature’s 50% cutoff wavelength was 5.2 μm. The measured current reached the system limit of 0.1 pA at 110 K for 30 μm pixel-sized diodes. At 77 K, where the LWIR channel operated with a 50% cutoff wavelength at 11.2 μm, an LWIR selectivity of ∼17% was achieved in the MWIR wave band between 3 and 4.7 μm, making the detector highly selective. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High Detectivity InGaAs/InGaP Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors Grown by Low Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, T. O'Sullivan, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T. Sills, K. Mi, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology 9 (12)-- March 29, 2004 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High operating temperature MWIR photon detectors based on Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice
M. Razeghi, S. Abdollahi Pour, E.K. Huang, G. Chen, A. Haddadi and B.M. Nguyen
SPIE Proceedings, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXVII, Orlando, FL, Vol. 8012, p. 80122Q-1-- April 26, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent efforts have been paid to elevate the operating temperature of Type II superlattice Mid Infrared photon detectors. Using M-structure superlattice, novel device architectures have been developed, resulting in significant improvement of the device performances. In this paper, we will compare different photodetector architectures and discuss the optimization scheme which leads to almost one order of magnitude of improvement to the electrical performance. At 150K, single element detectors exhibit a quantum efficiency above 50%, and a specific detectivity of 1.05x10(12) cm.Hz(1/2)/W. BLIP operation with a 300K background and 2π FOV can be reached with an operating temperature up to 180K. High quality focal plane arrays were demonstrated with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) of 11mK up to 120K. Human body imaging is achieved at 150K with NEDT of 150mK. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Recent advances in IR semiconductor laser diodes and future trends
M. Razeghi; Y. Bai; N. Bandyopadhyay; B. Gokden; Q.Y. Lu; S. Slivken
Photonics Society Summer Topical Meeting Series, IEEE [6000041], pp. 55-56 (2011)-- July 18, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
The wall plug efficiency of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser in room temperature continuous wave (cw) operation is brought to 21%, with a maximum output power of 5.1 W. Using a surface grating distributed feedback (DFB) approach, we demonstrated 2.4 W single mode output in room temperature cw operation. With a photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) design, we achieved single mode spectrum and close to diffraction limited far field with a room temperature high peak power of 34 W. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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