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3.  Recent Advances in LWIR Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodetectors and Focal Plane Arrays at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi, D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, M.Z. Tidrow, and V. Nathan
IEEE Proceedings, Vol. 97, No. 6, p. 1056-1066-- June 1, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors have experienced significant improvements in material quality, structural designs, and imaging applications. They now appear to be a possible alternative to the state-of-the-art HgCdTe (MCT) technology in the long and very long wavelength infrared regimes. At the Center for Quantum Devices, we have successfully realized very high quantum efficiency, very high dynamic differential resistance R0A - product LWIR Type – II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with efficient surface passivation techniques. The demonstration of high quality LWIR Focal Plane Arrays that were 100 % fabricated in - house reaffirms the pioneer position of this university-based laboratory. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Room temperature continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with 12.5% wall plug efficiency
Y. Bai, S. Slivken, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 2, p. 021103-1-- July 14, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP based quantum cascade laser heterostructure emitting at 4.6 µm was grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The wafer was processed into a conventional double-channel ridge waveguide geometry with ridge widths of 19.7 and 10.6 µm without semi-insulating InP regrowth. An uncoated, narrow ridge device with a 4.8 mm cavity length was epilayer down bonded to a diamond submount and exhibits 2.5 W maximum output power with a wall plug efficiency of 12.5% at room temperature in continuous wave operation. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High-performance bias-selectable dual-band Short-/Mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors and focal plane arrays based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb Type-II superlattices
M. Razeghi; A.M. Hoang; A. Haddadi; G. Chen; S. Ramezani-Darvish; P. Bijjam; P. Wijewarnasuriy; E. Decuir
Proc. SPIE 8704, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXIX, 87041W (June 18, 2013)-- June 18, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a bias selectable dual-band Type-II superlattice-based short-wave infrared (SWIR) and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) co-located photodetector capable of active and passive imaging. A new double-layer etch-stop scheme is introduced for back-side-illuminated photodetectors, which enhanced the external quantum efficiency both in the SWIR and MWIR spectral regions. Temperature-dependent dark current measurements of pixel-sized 27 μm detectors found the dark current density to be ∼1×10-5 A/cm2 for the ∼4.2 μm cut-off MWIR channel at 140 K. This corresponded to a reasonable imager noise equivalent difference in temperature of ∼49 mK using F/2.3 optics and a 10 ms integration time (tint), which lowered to ∼13 mK at 110 K using and integration time of 30 ms, illustrating the potential for high-temperature operation. The SWIR channel was found to be limited by readout noise below 150 K. An excellent imagery from the dual-band imager exemplifying pixel coincidence is shown. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Ga0.51In0.49P/InxGa1-xAs/GaAs Modulation-doped Field-effect Transistor Structures
C. Besikci, Y. Civan, S. Ozder, O. Sen, C. Jelen, S. Slivken, and M. Razeghi
Semiconductor Science Technology 12-- January 1, 1997 ...[Visit Journal]
Lattice-matched Ga0.51In0.49P/GaAs and strained Ga0.51In0.49P/InxGa1−xAs/GaAs (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.25) modulation-doped field-effect transistor structures were grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy by using Si as dopant. Detailed electrical characterization results are presented. The Ga0.5In0.49P/In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs sample yielded dark two-dimensional electron gas densities of 3.75 x 1012 cm-2 (300 K) and 2.3 x 1012 cm-2 (77 K) which are comparable to the highest sheet electron densities reported in AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs and InAlAs/InGaAs/InP modulation-doped heterostructures. Persistent photoconductivity was observed in the strained samples only. A 0.797 eV deep level has been detected in the undoped GaInP layers of the structures. Another level, with DLTS peak height dependent on the filling pulse width, has been detected at the interface of the strained samples. Based on the DLTS and Hall effect measurement results, this level, which seems to be the origin of persistent photoconductivity, can be attributed to the strain relaxation related defects. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High-Power (~9 μm) Quantum Cascade Lasers
S. Slivken, Z. Huang, A. Evans, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 80 (22)-- June 3, 2002 ...[Visit Journal]
High-power quantum cascade lasers emitting at λ > 9 μm are demonstrated. Accurate control of layer thickness and interfaces is evidenced by x-ray diffraction. Excellent peak power for uncoated lasers, up to 3.5 W per facet for a 25 μm emitter width, is obtained at 300 K for 75 period structures. The threshold current density at 300 K is only 1.4 kA/cm². From 300 to 425 K, the laser exhibits a characteristic temperature, T0, of 167 K. Over 150 mW of average power is measured per facet for a duty cycle of 6%. Simulation of the average power output reveals a thermal resistance of 12 K/W for epilayer-up mounted ridges. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Overview of Quantum Cascade Laser Research at the Center for Quantum Devices
S. Slivken, A. Evans, J. Nguyen, Y. Bai, P. Sung, S.R. Darvish, W. Zhang and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000B-1-8.-- February 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
Over the past several years, our group has endeavored to develop high power quantum cascade lasers for a variety of remote and high sensitivity infrared applications. The systematic optimization of laser performance has allowed for demonstration of high power, continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating above room temperature. In the past year alone, the efficiency and power of our short wavelength lasers (~4.8 µm) has doubled. In continuous wave at room temperature, we have now separately demonstrated ~10% wallplug efficiency and ~700 mW of output power. Up to now, we have been able to show that room temperature continuous wave operation with > 100 mW output power in the 3.8 < λ < 11.5 µm wavelength range is possible. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Core-shell GaN-ZnO Moth-eye Nanostructure Arrays Grown on a-SiO2/Si (111) as a basis for Improved InGaN-based Photovoltaics and LEDs
D.J. Rogers, V.E. Sandana, S. Gautier, T. Moudakir, M. Abid, A. Ougazzaden, F. Hosseini Teherani, P. Bove, M. Molinari, M. Troyon, M. Peres, Manuel J. Soares, A.J. Neves, T. Monteiro, D. McGrouther, J.N. Chapman, H.-J. Drouhin, R. McClintock, M. Razeghi
Photonics and Nanostructures - Fundamentals and Applications (2015)-- March 30, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
Self-forming, vertically-aligned, ZnO moth-eye-like nanoarrays were grown by catalyst-free pulsed laser deposition on a-SiO2/Si (111) substrates. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies indicated that nanostructures were highly c-axis oriented wurtzite ZnO with strong near band edge emission. The nanostructures were used as templates for the growth of non-polar GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. XRD, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and CL revealed ZnO encapsulated with GaN, without evidence of ZnO back-etching. XRD showed compressive epitaxial strain in the GaN, which is conducive to stabilization of the higher indium contents required for more efficient green light emitting diode (LED) and photovoltaic (PV) operation. Angular-dependent specular reflection measurements showed a relative reflectance of less than 1% over the wavelength range of 400–720 nm at all angles up to 60°. The superior black-body performance of this moth-eye-like structure would boost LED light extraction and PV anti-reflection performance compared with existing planar or nanowire LED and PV morphologies. The enhancement in core conductivity, provided by the ZnO, would also improve current distribution and increase the effective junction area compared with nanowire devices based solely on GaN. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Investigation of MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures grown on c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition
D. J. Rogers ; F. Hosseini Teherani ; P. Bove ; A. Lusson ; M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8626, Oxide-based Materials and Devices IV, 86261X (March 18, 2013)-- March 18, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
MgZnO thin films were grown on c-sapphire and ZnO-coated c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition from a ZnMgO target with 4 at% Mg. The MgZnO grown on the ZnO underlayer showed significantly better crystal quality than that grown directly on sapphire. AFM studies revealed a significant deterioration in surface morphology for the MgZnO layers compared with the ZnO underlayer. Optical transmission studies indicated a MgZnO bandgap of 3.61eV (compared with 3.34eV for the ZnO), which corresponds to a Mg content of about 16.1 at%. The MgZnO/ZnO heterojunction showed an anomalously low resistivity, which was more than two orders of magnitude less than the MgZnO layer and an order of magnitude lower than that for the ZnO layer. It was suggested that this may be attributable to the presence of a 2D electron gas at the ZnMgO/ZnO heterointerface. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Gallium nitride on silicon for consumer & scalable photonics
C. Bayram, K.T. Shiu, Y. Zhu, C.W. Cheng, D.K. Sadana, Z. Vashaei, E. Cicek, R. McClintock and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8631, p. 863112-1, Photonics West, San Francisco, CA-- February 4, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Gallium Nitride (GaN) is a unique material system that has been heavily exploited for photonic devices thanks to ultraviolet-to-terahertz spectral tunability. However, without a cost effective approach, GaN technology is limited to laboratory demonstrations and niche applications. In this investigation, integration of GaN on Silicon (100) substrates is attempted to enable widespread application of GaN based optoelectronics. Controlled local epitaxy of wurtzite phase GaN on on-axis Si(100) substrates is demonstrated via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). CMOS-compatible fabrication scheme is used to realize [SiO2-Si{111}-Si{100}] groove structures on conventional 200-mm Si(100) substrates. MOCVD growth (surface treatment, nucleation, initiation) conditions are studied to achieve controlled GaN epitaxy on such grooved Si(100) substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques are used to determine uniformity and defectivity of the GaN. Our results show that aforementioned groove structures along with optimized MOCVD growth conditions can be used to achieve controlled local epitaxy of wurtzite phase GaN on on-axis Si(100) substrates. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Electrically pumped photonic crystal distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers
Y. Bai, S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, P. Sung, J. Nguyen, A. Evans, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 14, p. 141123-1-- October 1, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate electrically pumped, room temperature, single mode operation of photonic crystal distributed feedback (PCDFB) quantum cascade lasers emitting at ~4.75 µm. Ridge waveguides of 100 µm width were fabricated with both PCDFB and Fabry-Pérot feedback mechanisms. The Fabry-Pérot device has a broad emitting spectrum and a double lobed far-field character. The PCDFB device, as expected, has primarily a single spectral mode and a diffraction limited far field characteristic with a full angular width at half maximum of 2.4°. This accomplishment represents the first step in power scaling of single mode, midinfrared laser diodes operating at room temperature. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Investigation of impurities in type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices via capacitance-voltage measurement
G. Chen, A. M. Hoang, S. Bogdanov, A. Haddadi, P. R. Bijjam, B.-M. Nguyen, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 103, 033512 (2013)-- July 17, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Capacitance-voltage measurement was utilized to characterize impurities in the non-intentionally doped region of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice p-i-n photodiodes. Ionized carrier concentration versus temperature dependence revealed the presence of a kind of defects with activation energy below 6 meV and a total concentration of low 1015 cm−3. Correlation between defect characteristics and superlattice designs was studied. The defects exhibited a p-type behavior with decreasing activation energy as the InAs thickness increased from 7 to 11 monolayers, while maintaining the GaSb thickness of 7 monolayers. With 13 monolayers of InAs, the superlattice became n-type and the activation energy deviated from the p-type trend. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Recent performance records for mid-IR quantum cascade lasers
M. Razeghi; Y. Bai; S. Slivken; S. Kuboya; S.R. Darvish
Terahertz and Mid Infrared Radiation: Basic Research and Practical Applications, 2009. TERA-MIR International Workshop [5379656], (2009) -- November 9, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The wall plug efficiency of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser in room temperature continuous wave operation is brought to 17%. Peak output power from a broad area (400 μm x 3 mm) device gives 120 W output power in pulsed mode operation at room temperature. Using a single-well-injector design, specifically made for low temperature operation, a record wall plug efficiency of 53% is demonstrated at 40 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High performance long wavelength infrared mega-pixel focal plane array based on type-II superlattices
P. Manurkar, S.R. Darvish, B.M. Nguyen, M. Razeghi and J. Hubbs
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No 19, p. 193505-1-- November 8, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
A large format 1k × 1k focal plane array (FPA) is realized using type-II superlattice photodiodes for long wavelength infrared detection. Material growth on a 3 in. GaSb substrate exhibits a 50% cutoff wavelength of 11 μm across the entire wafer. The FPA shows excellent imaging. Noise equivalent temperature differences of 23.6 mK at 81 K and 22.5 mK at 68 K are achieved with an integration time of 0.13 ms, a 300 K background and f/4 optics. We report a dark current density of 3.3×10−4 A·cm−2 and differential resistance-area product at zero bias R0A of 166 Ω·cm² at 81 K, and 5.1×10−5 A·cm−2 and 1286 Ω·cm², respectively, at 68 K. The quantum efficiency obtained is 78%. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High performance bias-selectable dual-band short-/mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices
A.M. Hoang, G. Chen, A. Haddadi and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8631, p. 86311K-1, Photonics West, San Francisco, CA-- February 5, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Active and passive imaging in a single camera based on the combination of short-wavelength and mid-wavelength infrared detection is highly needed in a number of tracking and reconnaissance missions. Due to its versatility in band-gap engineering, Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattice has emerged as a candidate highly suitable for this multi-spectral detection. In this paper, we report the demonstration of high performance bias-selectable dual-band short-/mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice with designed cut-off wavelengths of 2 μm and 4 μm. Taking advantages of the high performance short-wavelength and mid-wavelength single color photodetectors, back-to-back p-i-n-n-i-p photodiode structures were grown on GaSb substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. At 150 K, the short-wave channel exhibited a quantum efficiency of 55%, a dark current density of 1.0x10-9 A/cm² at -50 mV bias voltage, providing an associated shot noise detectivity of 3.0x1013 Jones. The mid-wavelength channel exhibited a quantum efficiency of 33% and a dark current density of 2.6x10-5 A/cm² at 300 mV bias voltage, resulting in a detectivity of 4.0x1011 Jones. The operations of the two absorber channels are selectable by changing the polarity of applied bias voltage. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Scale-up of the Chemical Lift-off of (In)GaN-based p-i-n Junctions from Sapphire Substrates Using Sacrificial ZnO Template Layers
D. J. Rogers, S. Sundaram, Y. El Gmili, F. Hosseini Teherani, P. Bove, V. Sandana, P. L. Voss, A. Ougazzaden, A. Rajan, K.A. Prior, R. McClintock, & M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9364, Oxide-based Materials and Devices VI, 936424 -- March 24, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
(In)GaN p-i-n structures were grown by MOVPE on both GaN- and ZnO-coated c-sapphire substrates. XRD studies of the as-grown layers revealed that a strongly c-axis oriented wurtzite crystal structure was obtained on both templates and that there was a slight compressive strain in the ZnO underlayer which increased after GaN overgrowth. The InGaN peak position gave an estimate of 13.6at% for the indium content in the active layer. SEM and AFM revealed that the top surface morphologies were similar for both substrates, with an RMS roughness (5 μm x 5 μm) of about 10 nm. Granularity appeared slightly coarser (40nm for the device grown on ZnO vs 30nm for the device grown on the GaN template) however. CL revealed a weaker GaN near band edge UV emission peak and a stronger broad defect-related visible emission band for the structure grown on the GaN template. Only a strong ZnO NBE UV emission was observed for the sample grown on the ZnO template. Quarter-wafer chemical lift-off (CLO) of the InGaN-based p-i-n structures from the sapphire substrate was achieved by temporary-bonding the GaN surface to rigid glass support with wax and then selectively dissolving the ZnO in 0.1M HCl. XRD studies revealed that the epitaxial nature and strong preferential c-axis orientation of the layers had been maintained after lift-off. This demonstration of CLO scale-up, without compromising the crystallographic integrity of the (In)GaN p-i-n structure opens up the perspective of transferring GaN based devices off of sapphire substrates industrially. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Low irradiance background limited type-II superlattice MWIR M-barrier imager
E.K. Huang, S. Abdollahi Pour, M.A. Hoang, A. Haddadi, M. Razeghi and M.Z. Tidrow
OSA Optics Letters (OL), Vol. 37, No. 11, p. 2025-2027-- June 1, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a type-II superlattice mid-wave infrared 320 × 256 imager at 81 K with the M-barrier design that achieved background limited performance (BLIP) and ∼99%operability. The 280 K blackbody’s photon irradiance was limited by an aperture and a band-pass filter from 3.6 μm to 3.8 μm resulting in a total flux of ∼5 × 1012 ph·cm−2·s−1. Under these low-light conditions, and consequently the use of a 13.5 ms integration time, the imager was observed to be BLIP thanks to a ∼5 pA dark current from the 27 μm wide pixels. The total noise was dominated by the photon flux and read-out circuit which gave the imager a noise equivalent input of ∼5 × 1010 ph·cm−2·s−1 and temperature sensitivity of 9 mK with F∕2.3 optics. Excellent imagery obtained using a 1-point correction alludes to the array’s uniform responsivity. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High Power, Continuous-Wave, Quantum Cascade Lasers for MWIR and LWIR Applications
S. Slivken, A. Evans, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, Vol. 6127, pp. 612703-- January 23, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
Over the past several years, our group has endeavored to develop high power quantum cascade lasers for a variety of remote and high sensitivity infrared applications. The systematic optimization of laser performance has allowed for demonstration of high power, continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating above room temperature. Since 2002, the power levels for individual devices have jumped from 20 mW to 600 mW. Expanding on this development, we have able to demonstrate continuous wave operation at many wavelengths throughout the mid- and far-infrared spectral range, and have now achieved >100 mW output in the 4.0 to 9.5 µm range. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-detectivity quantum-dot infrared photodetectors grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition
J. Szafraniec, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, H. Lim, M. Taguchi, A.A. Quivy, B. Movaghar and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 88 (121102)-- March 20, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
A mid-wavelength infrared photodetector based on InGaAs quantum dots buried in an InGaP matrix and deposited on a GaAs substrate was demonstrated. Its photoresponse at T=77 K was measured to be around 4.7 μm with a cutoff at 5.5 μm. Due to the high peak responsivity of 1.2 A/W and low dark-current noise of the device, a specific peak detectivity of 1.1 x 1012 cm·Hz½·W−1 was achieved at −0.9 V bias [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High Quality Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattices with Cutoff Wavelength ~3.7 µm Using Interface Engineering
Y. Wei, J. Bae, A. Gin, A. Hood, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M. Tidrow
Journal of Applied Physics, 94 (7)-- October 1, 2003 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the most recent advance in the area of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices that have cutoff wavelength of ~3.7 µm. With GaxIn1–x type interface engineering techniques, the mismatch between the superlattices and the GaSb (001) substrate has been reduced to <0.1%. There is no evidence of dislocations using the best examination tools of x-ray, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The full width half maximum of the photoluminescence peak at 11 K was ~4.5 meV using an Ar+ ion laser (514 nm) at fluent power of 140 mW. The integrated photoluminescence intensity was linearly dependent on the fluent laser power from 2.2 to 140 mW at 11 K. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurement revealed a characteristic temperature of one T1 = 245 K at sample temperatures below 160 K with fluent power of 70 mW, and T1 = 203 K for sample temperatures above 180 K with fluent power of 70 and 420 mW. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Quantum-Cascade Lasers Operating in Continuous-Wave Mode Above 90°C at λ ~5.25 µm
A. Evans, J. Nguyen, S. Slivken, J.S. Yu, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 88 (5)-- January 30, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the design and fabrication of λ~5.25 μm quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) for very high temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation. CW operation is reported up to a maximum temperature of 90 °C (363 K). CW output power is reported in excess of 500 mW near room temperature with a low threshold current density. A finite element thermal model is used to investigate the Gth and maximum CW operating temperature of the QCLs. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors: Comparison Experiment and Theory
H. Lim, W. Zhang, S. Tsao, T. Sills, J. Szafraniec, K. Mi, B. Movaghar, and M. Razeghi
Physical Review B, 72-- August 17, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We present data and calculations and examine the factors that determine the detectivities in self-assembled InAs and InGaAs based quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs). We investigate a class of devices that combine good wavelength selectivity with “high detectivity.” We study the factors that limit the temperature performance of quantum dot detectors. For this we develop a formalism to evaluate the optical absorption and the electron transport properties. We examine the performance limiting factors and compare theory with experimental data. We find that the notion of a phonon bottleneck does not apply to large-diameter lenslike quantum dots, which have many closely spaced energy levels. The observed strong decrease of responsivity with temperature is ultimately due to a rapid thermal cascade back into the ground states. High temperature performance is improved by engineering the excited state to be near the continuum. The good low temperature (77 K) performance in strongly bound QDIPs is shown to be due to the high gain and the low noise achievable in these micron size devices. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-Average-Power, High-Duty-Cycle (~6 μm) Quantum Cascade Lasers
S. Slivken, A. Evans, J. David, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 81 (23)-- December 2, 2002 ...[Visit Journal]
High-power quantum cascade lasers emitting at λ = 6.1  μm are demonstrated. Accurate control of growth parameters and strain balancing results in a near-perfect lattice match, which leads to excellent material quality. Excellent peak power for uncoated lasers, up to 1.5 W per facet for a 21 μm emitter width, is obtained at 300 K for 30 period structures. The threshold current density at 300 K is only 2.4 kA/cm². From 300 to 425 K, the laser exhibits a characteristic temperature T0 of 167 K. Next, Y2O3/Ti/Au mirror coatings were deposited on 1.5 mm cavities and mounted epilayer down. These lasers show an average output power of up to 225 mW at 17% duty cycle, and still show 8 mW average power at 45% duty cycle. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Quantum cascade lasers that emit more light than heat
Y. Bai, S. Slivken, S. Kuboya, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
Nature Photonics, February 2010, Vol. 4, p. 99-102-- February 1, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
For any semiconductor lasers, the wall plug efficiency, that is, the portion of the injected electrical energy that can be converted into output optical energy, is one of the most important figures of merit. A device with a higher wall plug efficiency has a lower power demand and prolonged device lifetime due to its reduced self-heating. Since its invention, the power performance of the quantum cascade laser has improved tremendously. However, although the internal quantum efficiency can be engineered to be greater than 80% at low temperatures, the wall plug efficiency of a quantum cascade laser has never been demonstrated above 50% at any temperature. The best wall plug efficiency reported to date is 36% at 120 K. Here, we overcome the limiting factors using a single-well injector design and demonstrate 53% wall plug efficiency at 40 K with an emitting wavelength of 5 µm. In other words, we demonstrate a quantum cascade laser that produces more light than heat. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-power λ ~ 9.5 µm quantum-cascade lasers operating above room temperature in continuous-wave mode
J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, A. Evans, S.R. Darvish, J. Nguyen, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 88 (9)-- February 27, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
We report high-power continuous-wave (cw) operation of λ~9.5 μm quantum-cascade lasers to a temperature of 318 K. A high-reflectivity-coated 19-μm-wide and 3-mm-long device exhibits cw output powers as high as 150 mW at 288 K and still 22 mW at 318 K. In cw operation at 298 K, a threshold current density of 1.57 kA/cm2, a slope efficiency of 391 mW/A, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 0.71% are obtained. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High performance antimony based type-II superlattice photodiodes on GaAs substrates
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 7298, Orlando, FL 2009, p. 72981T-- April 13, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices grown on GaSb substrate have achieved significant advances in both structural design and material growth, making Type-II superlattice infrared detector a rival competitor to the state-of-the-art MCT technology. However, the limited size and strong infrared absorption of GaSb substrates prevent large format type-II superlattice infrared imagers from being realized. In this work, we demonstrate type-II superlattices grown on GaAs substrates, which is a significant step toward third generation infrared imaging at low cost. The device performances of Type-II superalttice photodetectors grown on these two substrates are compared. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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