Page 5 of 11:  Prev << 1 2 3 4 5  6 7 8 9 10 11  >> Next  (268 Items)

3.  Monolithic terahertz source
Q. Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Nature Photonics | Research Highlights -- July 31, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
To date, the production of continuous-wave terahertz (THz) sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers operating at room temperature has proved elusive. A critical problem is that, to achieve a large nonlinear susceptibility for frequency conversion, the active region of the quantum cascade laser requires high doping, which elevates the lasing threshold current density. Now, Quan-Yong Lu and colleagues from Northwestern University in the USA have overcome this problem and demonstrated a room-temperature continuous-wave THz source based on difference-frequency generation in quantum cascade lasers. They designed quantum-well structures based on In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As material system for two mid-infrared wavelengths. The average doping in the active region was about 2.5 × 1016 cm−3. A buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with the Čerenkov phase-matching scheme was used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance heat dissipation. As a result, single-mode emission at 3.6 THz was observed at 293 K. The continuous-wave THz power reached 3 μW with a conversion efficiency of 0.44 mW W−2 from mid-infrared to THz waves. Using a similar device design, a THz peak power of 1.4 mW was achieved in pulse mode. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  Room temperature compact THz sources based on quantum cascade laser technology
M. Razeghi; Q.Y. Lu; N. Bandyopadhyay; S. Slivken; Y. Bai
Proc. SPIE 8846, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications IV, 884602 (September 24, 2013)-- November 24, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We present the high performance THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Room temperature single-mode operation in a wide THz spectral range of 1-4.6 THz is demonstrated from our Čerenkov phase-matched THz sources with dual-period DFB gratings. High THz power up to 215 μW at 3.5 THz is demonstrated via epi-down mounting of our THz device. The rapid development renders this type of THz sources promising local oscillators for many astronomical and medical applications. [reprint (PDF)]
 
3.  High Power 0.98 μm GaInAs/GaAs/GaInP Multiple Quantum Well Laser
K. Mobarhan, M. Razeghi, G. Marquebielle and E. Vassilaki
Journal of Applied Physics 72 (9)-- November 1, 1992 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the fabrication of high quality Ga0.8In0.2As/GaAs/Ga0.51In0.49P multiple quantum well laser emitting at 0.98 μm grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Continuous wave operation with output power of 500 mW per facet was achieved at room temperature for a broad area laser with 130 μm width and 300 μm cavity length. This is an unusually high value of output power for this wavelength laser in this material system. The differential quantum efficiency exceeded 75% with excellent homogeneity and uniformity. The characteristic temperature, T0 was in the range of 120–130 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Ultraviolet avalanche photodiodes
Ryan McClintock ; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9555, Optical Sensing, Imaging, and Photon Counting: Nanostructured Devices and Applications, 95550B -- August 28, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
The III-Nitride material system is rapidly maturing; having proved itself as a material for LEDs and laser, and now finding use in the area of UV photodetectors. However, many UV applications are still dominated by the use of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). PMTs are capable of obtaining very high sensitivity using internal electron multiplication gain (typically ~106). It is highly desirable to develop a compact semiconductor-based photodetector capable of realizing this level of sensitivity. In principle, this can be obtained in III-Nitrides by taking advantage of avalanche multiplication under high electric fields – typically 2.7 MV/cm, which with proper design can correspond to an external reverse bias of less than 100 volts. In this talk, we review the current state-of-the-art in III-Nitride solar- and visible-blind APDs, and present our latest results on GaN APDs grown on both conventional sapphire and low dislocation density free-standing c- and m-plane GaN substrates. Leakage current, gain, and single photon detection efficiency (SPDE) of these APDs were compared. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance of UV APDs are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities as much as 30% being demonstrated in smaller devices. Geiger-mode operation conditions are optimized for enhanced SPDE. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  The effect of doping the M-barrier in very long-wave type-II InAs/GaSb heterodiodes
D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and J. Pellegrino
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 3, p. 031107-1-- July 21, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
A variation on the standard homo-diode Type-II superlattice with an M-barrier between the pi-region and the n-region is shown to suppress the dark currents. By determining the optimal doping level of the M-superlattice, dark current densities of 4.95 mA·cm-2 and quantum efficiencies in excess of 20% have been demonstrated at the moderate reverse bias of 50 mV; allowing for near background-limited performance with a Johnson-noise detectivity of 3.11×1010 Jones at 77 K for a 14.58 µm cutoff wavelength for large area diodes without passivation. This is comparable to values for the state-of-the-art HgCdTe photodiodes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Development of material quality and structural design for high performance type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes and focal plane arrays
M. Razeghi, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, M.Z. Tidrow and V. Nathan
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 7082, San Diego, CA 2008, p. 708204-- August 11, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent progress made in the structure design, growth and processing of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors lifted both the quantum efficiency and the R0A product of the detectors. Type-II superlattice demonstrated its ability to perform imaging in the Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR)and Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) ranges, becoming a potential competitor for technologies such as Quantum Well Infrared Photo-detectors (QWIP) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT). Using an empirical tight-binding model, we developed superlattices designs that were nearly lattice-matched to the GaSb substrates and presented cutoff wavelengths of 5 and 11 μm. We demonstrated high quality material growth with X-ray FWHM below 30 arcsec and an AFM rms roughness of 1.5 Å over an area of 20x20 μm2. The detectors with a 5 μm cutoff, capable of operating at room temperature, showed a R0A of 1.25 106 Ω.cm2 at 77K, and a quantum efficiency of 32%. In the long wavelength infrared, we demonstrated high quantum efficiencies above 50% with high R0A products of 12 Ω.cm2 by increasing the thickness of the active region. Using the novel M-structure superlattice design, more than one order of magnitude improvement has been observed for electrical performance of the devices. Focal plane arrays in the middle and long infrared range, hybridized to an Indigo read out integrated circuit, exhibited high quality imaging. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Demonstration of a 256x256 Middle-Wavelength Infrared Focal Plane Array based on InGaAs/InGaP Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors (QDIPs)
J. Jiang, K. Mi, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T.O'Sullivan, T. Sills, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology 9 (13)-- April 5, 2004 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-Performance Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice Photodiodes with Cutoff Wavelength Around 7 µm
Y. Wei, A. Hood, H. Yau, V. Yazdanpanah, M. Razeghi, M.Z. Tidrow and V. Nathan
Applied Physics Letters, 86 (9)-- February 28, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the most recent result in the area of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes that have a cutoff wavelength around 7 µm at 77 K. Superlattice with a period of 40 Å lattice matched to GaSb was realized using GaxIn1–x type interface engineering technique. Compared with significantly longer period superlattices, we have reduced the dark current density under reverse bias dramatically. For a 3 µm thick structure, using sulfide-based passivation, the dark current density reached 2.6×10–5 A/cm2 at –3 V reverse bias at 77 K. At this temperature the photodiodes have R0A of 9300 Ω·cm2 and a thermally limited zero bias detectivity of 1×1012 cm·Hz½/W. The 90%–10% cutoff energy width was only 16.5 meV. The devices did not show significant dark current change at 77 K after three months storage in the atmosphere. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-Performance Focal Plane Arrays Based on InAs-GaSb Superlattices with a 10-micron Cutoff Wavelegth
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman and M. Razeghi
IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, Vol. 44, No. 5, p. 462-467-- May 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on the demonstration of a focal plane array based on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices grown on N-type GaSb substrate with a 50%-cutoff wavelength at 10 μm. The surface leakage occurring after flip-chip bonding and underfill in the Type-II devices was suppressed using a double heterostructure design. The R0A of diodes passivated with SiO2 was 23 Ω·cm2 after underfill. A focal plane array hybridized to an Indigo readout integrated circuit demonstrated a noise equivalent temperature difference of 33 mK at 81 K, with an integration time of 0.23 ms. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Recent advances in mid infrared (3-5 μm) quantum cascade lasers
Manijeh Razeghi; Neelanjan Bandyopadhyay; Yanbo Bai; Quanyong Lu; Steven Slivken
Optical Materials Express, Vol. 3, Issue 11, pp. 1872-1884 (2013)-- November 2, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is an important source of electromagnetic radiation in mid infrared region. Recent research in mid-IR QCLs has resulted in record high wallplug efficiency (WPE), high continuous wave (CW) output power, single mode operation and wide tunability. CW output power of 5.1 W with 21% WPE has been achieved at room temperature (RT). A record high WPE of 53% at 40K has been demonstrated. Operation wavelength of QCL in CW at RT has been extended to as short as 3μm. Very high peak power of 190 W has been obtained from a broad area QCL of ridge width 400μm. 2.4W RT, CW power output has been achieved from a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL. Wide tuning based on dual section sample grating DFB QCLs has resulted in individual tuning of 50cm-1 and 24 dB side mode suppression ratio with continuous wave power greater than 100 mW. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Gain and recombination dynamics in photodetectors made with quantum nanostructures: The quantum dot in a well and the quantum well
B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Abdollahi Pour, T. Yamanaka, and M. Razeghi
Physical Review B, Vol. 78, No. 11-- September 15, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
We consider the problem of charge transport and recombination in semiconductor quantum well infrared photodetectors and quantum-dot-in-a-well infrared detectors. The photoexcited carrier relaxation is calculated using rigorous random-walk and diffusion methods, which take into account the finiteness of recombination cross sections, and if necessary the memory of the carrier generation point. In the present application, bias fields are high and it is sufficient to consider the drift limited regime. The photoconductive gain is discussed in a quantum-mechanical language, making it more transparent, especially with regard to understanding the bias and temperature dependence. Comparing experiment and theory, we can estimate the respective recombination times. The method developed here applies equally well to nanopillar structures, provided account is taken of changes in mobility and trapping. Finally, we also derive formulas for the photocurrent time decays, which in a clean system at high bias are sums of two exponentials. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Substrate removal for high quantum efficiency back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb photodetectors
P.Y. Delaunay, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 23, p. 231106-- December 3, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
A substrate removal technique using an InAsSb etch stop layer improves by a factor of 2 the quantum efficiency of back side illuminated type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors. After etching of the GaSb substrate with a CrO3 based solution, the quantum efficiency of the diodes presents Fabry-Pérot oscillations averaging at 56%. Due to the confinement of the infrared light inside the devices, the quantum efficiency for certain devices reaches 75% at 8.5 µm. The implementation of this new technique to a focal plane array resulted in a decrease of the integration time from 0.23 to 0.08 ms. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Passivation of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors
A. Hood, Y. Wei, A. Gin, M. Razeghi, M. Tidrow, and V. Nathan
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp. 316-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Leakage currents limit the operation of high performance Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiode technology. Surface leakage current becomes a dominant limiting factor, especially at the scale of a focal plane array pixel (< 25 µm) and must be addressed. A reduction of the surface state density, unpinning the Fermi level at the surface, and appropriate termination of the semiconductor crystal are all aims of effective passivation. Recent work in the passivation of Type-II InAs\GaSb superlattice photodetectors with aqueous sulfur-based solutions has resulted in increased R0A products and reduced dark current densities by reducing the surface trap density. Additionally, photoluminescence of similarly passivated Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice and InAs GaSb bulk material will be discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Growth of AlGaN on silicon substrates: a novel way to make back-illuminated ultraviolet photodetectors
Ryan McClintock ; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 9555, Optical Sensing, Imaging, and Photon Counting: Nanostructured Devices and Applications, 95550U-- August 28, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
AlGaN, with its tunable wide-bandgap is a good choice for the realization of ultraviolet photodetectors. AlGaN films tend to be grown on foreign substrates such as sapphire, which is the most common choice for back-illuminated devices. However, even ultraviolet opaque substrates like silicon holds promise because, silicon can be removed by chemical treatment to allow back-illumination,1 and it is a very low-cost substrate which is available in large diameters up to 300 mm. However, Implementation of silicon as the solar-blind PD substrates requires overcoming the lattice-mismatch (17%) with the AlxGa1-xN that leads to high density of dislocation and crack-initiating stress. In this talk, we report the growth of thick crack-free AlGaN films on (111) silicon substrates through the use of a substrate patterning and mask-less selective area regrowth. This technique is critical as it decouples the epilayers and the substrate and allows for crack-free growth; however, the masking also helps to reduce the dislocation density by inclining the growth direction and encouraging dislocations to annihilate. A back-illuminated p-i-n PD structure is subsequently grown on this high quality template layer. After processing and hybridizing the device we use a chemical process to selectively remove the silicon substrate. This removal has minimal effect on the device, but it removes the UV-opaque silicon and allows back-illumination of the photodetector. We report our latest results of back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors growth on silicon. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Recent advances in LWIR type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors and focal plane arrays at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi, D. Hoffman, B.M. Nguyen, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, and M.Z. Tidrow
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 6940, Orlando, FL 2008, p. 694009-- March 17, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
In recent years, Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors have experienced significant improvements in material quality, structural designs, and imaging applications. They now appear to be a possible alternative to the state-of-the-art HgCdTe (MCT) technology in the long and very long wavelength infrared regimes. At the Center for Quantum Devices,we have successfully realized very high quantum efficiency, very high dynamic differential resistance R0A - product LWIR Type – II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes with efficient surface passivation techniques. The demonstration of high quality LWIR Focal Plane Arrays that were 100 % fabricated in - house reaffirms the pioneer position of this university-based laboratory. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Effect of contact doping on superlattice-based minority carrier unipolar detectors
B.M. Nguyen, G. Chen, A.M. Hoang, S. Abdollahi Pour, S. Bogdanov, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 99, No. 3, p. 033501-1-- July 18, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the influence of the contact doping profile on the performance of superlattice-based minority carrier unipolar devices for mid-wave infrared detection. Unlike in a photodiode, the space charge in the p-contact of a pMp unipolar device is formed with accumulated mobile carriers, resulting in higher dark current in the device with highly doped p-contact. By reducing the doping concentration in the contact layer, the dark current is decreased by one order of magnitude. At 150 K, 4.9 μm cut-off devices exhibit a dark current of 2 × 10−5A/cm² and a quantum efficiency of 44%. The resulting specific detectivity is 6.2 × 1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 150 K and exceeds 1.9 × 1014 cm·Hz1/2/W at 77 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  InP-based quantum-dot infrared photodetectors with high quantum efficiency and high temperature imaging
S. Tsao, H. Lim, H. Seo, W. Zhang and M. Razeghi
IEEE Sensors Journal, Vol. 8, No. 6, p. 936-941-- June 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a room temperature operating InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector grown on InP substrate. The self-assembled InAs quantum dots and the device structure were grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor depositon. The detectivity was 6 x 1010cm·Hz1/2·W-1 at 150 K and a bias of 5 V with a peak detection wavelength around 4.0 micron and a quantum efficiency of 48%. Due to the low dark current and high responsivity, a clear photoresponse has been observed at room temperature. A 320 x 256 middle wavelength infrared focal plane array operating at temperatures up to 200 K was also demonstrated. The focal plane array had 34 mA/W responsivity, 1.1% conversion efficiency, and noise equivalent temperature difference of 344 mK at 120 K operating temperature. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Research activity on Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice for LWIR detection and imaging at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi and B.M. Nguyen
American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings Vol. 949, Issue 1, p. 35-42, 6th International Workshop on Information Optics (WIO'07), Reykjavik, Iceland, June 25-30, 2007-- October 24, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Type-II superlattice photodetectors have recently experienced significant improvements in both theoretical structure design and experimental realization. Empirical Tight Binding Method was initiated and developed for Type-II superlattice. A new Type-II structure, called M-structure, was introduced and theoretically demonstrated high R0A, high quantum efficiency. Device design and growth condition were optimized to improve the performance. As a result, a 54% quantum efficiency, a 12 Ω·cm2 R0A were achieved for 11 µm cut-off photodetector at 77 K. Effective surface passivation techniques for MWIR and LWIR Type-II superlattice were developed. FPA imaging at MWIR and LWIR were demonstrated with a capability of imaging up to room temperature and 211 K respectively. The noise equivalent temperature difference presented a peak at 50 mK for MWIR FPA at 121 K and 26 mK for LWIR FPA at 81 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Quntum Cascade Laser Breakthrough for Advanced Remote Detection
Manijeh Razeghi, Wenjia Zhou, Donghai Wu, Ryan McClintock, and Steven Slivken, Northwestern University
www.photonics.com-- November 1, 2016
The atoms in a molecule can bend, stretch and rotate with respect to one an­other, and these excitations are largely optically active. Most molecules, from simple to moderately complex, have a characteristic absorption spectrum in the 3- to 14-µrn wavelength range that can be uniquely identified and quantified in real time. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study these absorption features and de­velop different molecular "fingerprints."
 
2.  Widely tuned room temperature terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on difference-frequency generation
Q.Y. Lu, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken, Y. Bai and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 101, No. 25, p. 251121-1-- December 17, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate room temperature THz quantum cascade laser sources with a broad spectral coverage based on intracavity difference-frequency generation. Two mid-infrared active cores based on the single-phonon resonance scheme are designed with a THz nonlinearity specially optimized at the high operating fields that correspond to the highest mid-infrared output powers. A Čerenkov phase-matching scheme along with integrated dual-period distributed feedback gratings are used for efficient THz extraction and spectral purification. Single mode emissions from 1.0 to 4.6 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio and output power up to 40 dB and 32 μW are obtained, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Growth and Characterization of Long-Wavelength Infrared Type-II Superlattice Photodiodes on a 3-in GaSb Wafer
B.M. Nguyen, G. Chen, M.A. Hoang, and M. Razeghi
IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics (JQE), Vol. 47, No. 5, May 2011, p. 686-690-- May 11, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of high performance Type-II superlattice photodiodes on 3” GaSb substrates for long wavelength infrared detection. A 7.3 micron thick device structure shows excellent structural homogeneity via atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction characterization. Optical and electrical measurements of photodiodes reveal not only the uniformity of the Type-II superlattice material but also of the fabrication process. Across the wafer, at 77 K, photodiodes with a 50% cut-off wavelength of 11 micron exhibit more than 45% quantum efficiency, and a dark current density of 1.0 x 10-4 A/cm² at 50 mV, resulting in a specific detectivity of 6x1011 cm·Hz1/2/W. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Dark current suppression in Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice long wavelength infrared photodiodes with M-structure barrier
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 16, p. 163511-1-- October 15, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
We presented an alternative design of Type-II superlattice photodiodes with the insertion of a mid-wavelength infrared M-structure AlSb/GaSb/InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattice for the reduction of dark current. The M-structure superlattice has a larger carrier effective mass and a greater band discontinuity as compared to the standard Type-II superlattices at the valence band. It acts as an effective medium that weakens the diffusion and tunneling transport at the depletion region. As a result, a 10.5 µm cutoff Type-II superlattice with 500 nm M-superlattice barrier exhibited a R0A of 200 cm2 at 77 K, approximately one order of magnitude higher than the design without the barrier. The quantum efficiency of such structures does not show dependence on either barrier thickness or applied bias. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Antimonide-Based Type II Superlattices: A Superior Candidate for the Third Generation of Infrared Imaging Systems
M. Razeghi, A. Haddadi, A.M. Hoang, G. Chen, S. Bogdanov, S.R. Darvish, F. Callewaert, P.R. Bijjam, and R. McClintock
Journal of ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, Vol. 43, No. 8, 2014-- August 1, 2014 ...[Visit Journal]
Type II superlattices (T2SLs), a system of interacting multiquantum wells,were introduced by Nobel Laureate L. Esaki in the 1970s. Since then, this material system has drawn a lot of attention, especially for infrared detection and imaging. In recent years, the T2SL material system has experienced incredible improvements in material growth quality, device structure design, and device fabrication techniques that have elevated the performance of T2SL-based photodetectors and focal-plane arrays (FPAs) to a level comparable to state-of-the-art material systems for infrared detection and imaging, such as mercury cadmium telluride compounds. We present the current status of T2SL-based photodetectors and FPAs for imaging in different infrared regimes, from short wavelength to very long wavelength, and dual-band infrared detection and imaging, as well as the future outlook for this material system. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  High-performance InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetectors grown on InP substrate operating at room temperature
H. Lim, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 13, p. 131112-1-- March 26, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
The authors report a room temperature operating InAs quantum-dot infrared photodetector grown on InP substrate. The self-assembled InAs quantum dots and the device structure were grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The detectivity was 2.8×1011 cm·Hz1/2/W at 120 K and a bias of −5 V with a peak detection wavelength around 4.1 μm and a quantum efficiency of 35%. Due to the low dark current and high responsivity, a clear photoresponse has been observed at room temperature, which gives a detectivity of 6.7×107 cm·Hz1/2/W. [reprint (PDF)]
 
2.  Characteristics of Self-Assembled InGaAs/InGaP Quantum Dot Mid-Infrared Photoconductive Detectors Grown by Low Pressure MOCVD
S. Kim, M. Erdtmann, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, San Jose, CA, -- January 27, 1999 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the first self-assembled InGaAs/InGaP quantum dot intersubband infrared photoconductive detectors (QDIPs) grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrate by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAs quantum dots were constructed on an InGaP matrix as self assembling in Stranski-Krastanow growth mode in optimum growth conditions. The detector structure was prepared for single layer and multi-stacked quantum dots for active region. Normal incident photoconductive response was observed at a peak wavelength of 5.5 μm with a high responsivity of 130 mA/W, and a detectivity of 4.74 X 107 cm·Hz½/W at 77 K for multi-stack QDIP. Low temperature photoresponse of the single quantum dot photodetector was characterized. Peak response was obtained between 16 K and 60 K. The detailed dark current noise measurements were carried on single and multistack quantum dot infrared detectors. High photoconductive gain as 7.6 x 103 biased at 0.5 V results in increasing the intersubband carrier relaxation time as two order of magnitude compared quantum well infrared photodetectors. [reprint (PDF)]
 

Page 5 of 11:  Prev << 1 2 3 4 5  6 7 8 9 10 11  >> Next  (268 Items)