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1.  High-Power Continuous-Wave Operation of a 6 µm Quantum-Cascade Laser at Room Temperature
J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, A. Evans, L. Doris, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13)-- September 29, 2003 ...[Visit Journal]
We report continuous-wave (cw) operation of quantum-cascade lasers (λ= 6 µm) using a thick electroplated Au top contact layer and epilayer-up bonding on a copper heat sink up to a temperature of 308 K (35 °C). The high cw optical output powers of 132 mW at 293 K and 21 mW at 308 K are achieved with threshold current densities of 2.29 and 2.91 kA/cm², respectively, for a high-reflectivity-coated 15 µm wide and 2 mm long laser. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Highly temperature insensitive quantum cascade lasers
Y. Bai, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Tsao, E. Selcuk, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No. 25-- December 20, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP based quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterostructure emitting around 5 μm is grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The QCL core design takes a shallow-well approach to maximize the characteristic temperatures, T(0) and T(1), for operations above room temperature. A T(0) value of 383 K and a T(1) value of 645 K are obtained within a temperature range of 298–373 K. In room temperature continuous wave operation, this design gives a single facet output power of 3 W and a wall plug efficiency of 16% from a device with a cavity length of 5 mm and a ridge width of 8 μm. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Crack-free AlGaN for solar-blind focal plane arrays through reduced area expitaxy
E. Cicek, R. McClintock, Z. Vashaei, Y. Zhang, S. Gautier, C.Y. Cho and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 102, No. 05, p. 051102-1-- February 4, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
We report on crack reduction for solar-blind ultraviolet detectors via the use of a reduced area epitaxy (RAE) method to regrow on patterned AlN templates. With the RAE method, a pre-deposited AlN template is patterned into isolated mesas in order to reduce the formation of cracks in the subsequently grown high Al-content AlxGa1−xN structure. By restricting the lateral dimensions of the epitaxial growth area, the biaxial strain is relaxed by the edges of the patterned squares, which resulted in ∼97% of the pixels being crack-free. After successful implementation of RAE method, we studied the optical characteristics, the external quantum efficiency, and responsivity of average pixel-sized detectors of the patterned sample increased from 38% and 86.2 mA/W to 57% and 129.4 mA/W, respectively, as the reverse bias is increased from 0 V to 5 V. Finally, we discussed the possibility of extending this approach for focal plane array, where crack-free large area material is necessary for high quality imaging. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  320x256 Solar-Blind Focal Plane Arrays based on AlxGa1-xN
R. McClintock, K. Mayes, A. Yasan, D. Shiell, P. Kung, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 86 (1)-- January 3, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
We report AlGaN-based back-illuminated solar-blind ultraviolet focal plane arrays operating at a wavelength of 280 nm. The electrical characteristics of the individual pixels are discussed, and the uniformity of the array is presented. The p–i–n photodiode array was hybridized to a 320×256 read-out integrated circuit entirely within our university research lab, and a working 320×256 camera was demonstrated. Several example solar-blind images from the camera are also provided. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Long Wavelength Type-II Photodiodes Operating at Room Temperature
H. Mohseni and M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 13 (5)-- May 1, 2001 ...[Visit Journal]
The operation of uncooled InAs-GaSb superlattice photodiodes with a cutoff wavelength of λc=8 μm and a peak detectivity of 1.2 × 108 cm·Hz½/W at zero bias is demonstrated. The detectivity is similar to the best uncooled HgCdTe detectors and microbolometers. However, the R0A product is more than two orders of magnitude higher than HgCdTe and the device is more than four orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. These features combined with their low 1/f noise and high uniformity make these type-II photodiodes an excellent choice for uncooled high-speed IR imaging arrays [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Highly selective two-color mid-wave and long-wave infrared detector hybrid based on Type-II superlattices
E.K. Huang, M.A. Hoang, G. Chen, S.R. Darvish, A. Haddadi, and M. Razeghi
Optics Letters, Vol. 37, No. 22, p. 4744-4746-- November 15, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a two-color mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) co-located detector with 3 μm active region thickness per channel that is highly selective and can perform under high operating temperatures for the MWIR band. Under back-side illumination, a temperature evolution study of the MWIR detector’s electro-optical performance found the 300 K background-limit with 2π field-of-view to be achieved below operating temperatures of 160 K, at which the temperature’s 50% cutoff wavelength was 5.2 μm. The measured current reached the system limit of 0.1 pA at 110 K for 30 μm pixel-sized diodes. At 77 K, where the LWIR channel operated with a 50% cutoff wavelength at 11.2 μm, an LWIR selectivity of ∼17% was achieved in the MWIR wave band between 3 and 4.7 μm, making the detector highly selective. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Gain-length scaling in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors
T. Yamanaka, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Kuboya, A. Myzaferi and M. Razeghi
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology-- September 14, 2009 ...[Visit Journal][reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High performance InAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIP) on InP by MOCVD
W. Zhang, H. Lim, M. Taguchi, S. Tsao, J. Szafraniec, B. Movaghar, M. Razeghi, and M. Tidrow
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp. 326-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Inter-subband detectors such as quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) have been widely used in infrared detection. Quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have been predicted to have better performance than QWIPs including higher operation temperature and normal incidence detection. Here we report our recent results of InAs QDIP grown on InP substrate by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The device structures consist of multiple stacks of InAs quantum dots with InP barriers. High detectivities in the range of 1010cm·Hz1/2/W were obtained at 77K. The measurements at higher temperatures show better temperature dependent performance than QWIP. However, the performances of QDIPs are still far from the expected. One of the reasons is the low quantum efficiency due to the low fill factor of quantum dots layer. Resonant cavity enhanced QDIP has been studied to increase the quantum efficiency. Different schemes of mirrors using free carrier plasma and distributed Bragg reflector are discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Background limited long wavelength infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes operating at 110 K
B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, E.K. Huang, P.Y. Delaunay, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 12, p. 123502-1-- September 22, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
The utilization of the P+-pi-M-N+ photodiode architecture in conjunction with a thick active region can significantly improve long wavelength infrared Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes. By studying the effect of the depletion region placement on the quantum efficiency in a thick structure, we achieved a topside illuminated quantum efficiency of 50% for an N-on-P diode at 8.0 µm at 77 K. Both the double heterostructure design and the application of polyimide passivation greatly reduce the surface leakage, giving an R0A of 416 Ω·cm2 for a 1% cutoff wavelength of 10.52 µm, a Shot–Johnson detectivity of 8.1×1011 cm·Hz½/W at 77 K, and a background limited operating temperature of 110 K with 300 K background. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Modeling of Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattices Using Empirical Tight-Binding Method and Interface Engineering
Y. Wei and M. Razeghi
Physical Review B, 69 (8)-- February 15, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
We report the most recent work on the modeling of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices using the empirical tight binding method in an sp3s* basis. After taking into account the antimony segregation in the InAs layers, the modeling accuracy of the band gap has been improved. Our calculations agree with our experimental results within a certain growth uncertainty. In addition, we introduce the concept of GaxIn1-x type interface engineering in order to reduce the lattice mismatch between the superlattice and the GaSb (001) substrate to improve the overall superlattice material quality. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Ridge-Width Dependence on High-Temperature Continuous-Wave Quantum-Cascade Laser Operation
S. Slivken, J.S. Yu, A. Evans, L. Doris, J. David, and M. Razeghi
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, 16 (3)-- March 1, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
We report continuous-wave (CW) operation of quantum-cascade lasers (λ=6 μm) up to a temperature of 313 K (40°C). The maximum CW optical output powers range from 212 mW at 288 K to 22 mW at 313 K and are achieved with threshold current densities of 2.21 and 3.11 kA/cm2, respectively, for a high-reflectivity-coated 12-μm-wide and 2-mm-long laser. At room temperature (298 K), the power output is 145 mW at 0.87 A, corresponding to a power conversion efficiency of 1.68%. The maximum CW operating temperature of double-channel ridge waveguide lasers mounted epilayer-up on copper heatsinks is analyzed in terms of the ridge width, which is varied between 12 and 40 μm. A clear trend of improved performance is observed as the ridge narrows. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Optimizing facet coating of quantum cascade lasers for low power consumption
Y. Bai, S.R. Darvish, N. Bandyopadhyay, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 109, No. 5, p. 053103-1-- March 1, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Typical high power consumption (∼10 W) of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) has been a serious limitation for applications in battery powered systems. A partial high-reflection (PHR) coating technique is introduced for power downscaling with shorter cavity lengths. The PHR coating consists of a double layer dielectric of SiO2 and Ge. With this technique, a 4.6 μm QCL with an ultra low threshold power consumption of less than a watt (0.83 W) is demonstrated in room temperature continuous wave operation. At 25°C, the maximum output power and wall plug efficiency are 192 mW and 8.6%, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Advanced Monolithic Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Integrated with Silicon Readout Integrated Circuit
J. Jiang, S. Tsao, K. Mi, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, C. Jelen and M.Z. Tidrow
Infrared Physics and Technology, 46 (3)-- January 1, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Today, most infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) utilize a hybrid scheme. To achieve higher device reliability and lower cost, monolithic FPAs with Si based readout integrated circuits (ROICs) are the trend of the future development. In this paper, two approaches for monolithic FPAs are proposed: double sided integration and selective epitaxy integration. For comparison, the fabrication process for hybrid quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) FPAs are also described. Many problems, such as the growth of QWIPs on Si substrate and processing incompatibility between Si and III–V semiconductors, need to be solved before monolithic FPAs can be realized. Experimental work on GaInAs/InP QWIP-on-Si is given in this paper. A record high detectivity of 2.3×109 jones was obtained for one QWIP-on-Si detector at 77 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Thermal Conductivity of InAs/GaSb Type II Superlattice
C. Zhou, B.M. Nguyen, M. Razeghi and M. Grayson
Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 41, No. 9, p. 2322-2325-- August 1, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
The cross-plane thermal conductivity of a type II InAs/GaSb superlattice(T2SL) is measured from 13 K to 300 K using the 3x method. Thermal conductivity is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude relative to the GaSb bulk substrate. The low thermal conductivity of around 1 W/m K to 8 W/m K may serve as an advantage for thermoelectric applications at low temperatures, while presenting a challenge for T2SL interband cascade lasers and highpower photodiodes. We describe a power-law approximation to model nonlinearities in the thermal conductivity, resulting in increased or decreased peak temperature for negative or positive exponents, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Gain-length scaling in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors
T. Yamanaka, B. Movaghar, S. Tsao, S. Kuboya, A. Myzaferi and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 9-- August 31, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The gain in quantum dot/quantum well infrared photodetectors is investigated. The scaling of the gain with device length has been analyzed, and the behavior agrees with the previously proposed model. We conclude that we understand the gain in the low bias region, but in the high field region, discrepancies remain. An extension of the gain model is presented to cover the very high electric field region. The high field data are compared to the extended model and discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Negative luminescence of long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes
D. Hoffman, A. Hood, Y. Wei, A. Gin, F. Fuchs, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 87 (20)-- November 14, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
The electrically pumped emission behavior of binary type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes has been studied in the spectral range between 8 µm and 13 µm. With a radiometric calibration of the experimental setup, the internal and external quantum efficiency has been determined in the temperature range between 80 K and 300 K for both, the negative and positive luminescence. The negative luminescence efficiency approaches values as high as 35% without antireflection coating. The temperature dependence of the internal quantum efficiency near zero-bias voltage allows for the determination of the electron-hole-electron Auger recombination coefficient of Γn=1×1024 cm6 s–1. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Optimized structure for InGaAsP/GaAs 808nm high power lasers
H. Yi, J. Diaz, L.J. Wang, I. Eliashevich, S. Kim, R. Williams, M. Erdtmann, X. He, E. Kolev and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 66 (24)-- June 12, 1995 ...[Visit Journal]
The optimized structure for the InGaAsP/GaAs quaternary material lasers (λ=0.808 μm) is investigated for the most efficient high‐power operation through an experiment and theoretical study. A comparative study is performed of threshold current density Jth and differential efficiency ηd dependence on cavity length (L) for two different laser structures with different active layer thickness (150 and 300 Å) as well as for laser structures with different multiple quantum well structures. A theoretical model with a more accurate formulation for minority leakage phenomenon provides explanation for the experimental results and sets general optimization rules for other lasers with similar restrictions on the band gap and refractive index difference between the active layer and the cladding layers. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Room temperature continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with 12.5% wall plug efficiency
Y. Bai, S. Slivken, S.R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 93, No. 2, p. 021103-1-- July 14, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
An InP based quantum cascade laser heterostructure emitting at 4.6 µm was grown with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The wafer was processed into a conventional double-channel ridge waveguide geometry with ridge widths of 19.7 and 10.6 µm without semi-insulating InP regrowth. An uncoated, narrow ridge device with a 4.8 mm cavity length was epilayer down bonded to a diamond submount and exhibits 2.5 W maximum output power with a wall plug efficiency of 12.5% at room temperature in continuous wave operation. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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